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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 27 Abr 2018 20:27 
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Gabriel Édouard Xavier Dupont (1878-1914) He was born in Caen. Following after his father who was a teacher at the Malherbe secondary school and the organist at the Church Saint-Étienne in his home town, Dupont began his studies at the conservatory of music and declamation at the age of 15. There he studied harmony with Antoine Taudou, descant with André Gedalge, and composition with Jules Massenet. In 1895, he was given instruction on the organ by Alexander Guilmant. Between 1897 and 1903, he studied composition with Charles-Marie Widor. Dupont's brothers also had artistic careers. Maurice, curator of the Guimet Museum, was an Oriental expert and man of letters. Robert (1874–1949) was a landscaper for Sarthe and Brittany, as well as an official painter of the town halls of Paris. In 1901, while performing his military service, Dupont competed for the Rome Prize. He won second prize, behind André Caplet but ahead of Maurice Ravel.

He was also named laureate of the Sonzogno competition for his opera La Cabrera, which was later presented with success at La Scala and then at the Théâtre national de l'Opéra-Comique in 1905. In 1903, Dupont composed a cycle of fourteen pieces for the piano, Les heures dolentes, during his convalescence from his first bout of tuberculosis — the disease that would ultimately cause his death at the age of 36. While residing at Cap Ferret, a small island refuge for tuberculosis patients, he composed another cycle of ten pieces for the piano, La Maison dans les dunes (1908–1909. Maurice Dumesnil premiered the suite on 3 June 1910 at the Salle Pleyel. Dupont wrote three more operas: La Glu (1909), a Breton melodrama based on a novel by Jean Richepin; La Farce du cuvier (1911), using a libretto by Henri Cain; and Antar (1912–1914), also using a Cain libretto. Antar was performed after Dupont's death in a grandiose and exotically dark production at the Opéra Comique in March 1921.

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La Cabrera, drama lírico en un acto (1904). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 04 May 2018 19:53 
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Jacopo (Giacomo) Puccini (1712-1781) He was born in Celle dei Puccini, Pescaglia. Puccini studied in Bologna under Giuseppe Carretti, who was maestro di cappella at Bologna's San Petronio Basilica. In Bologna Puccini became friends with Padre Martini. After returning to Lucca in 1739, he served as organist in the cathedral and later Maestro di Cappella to the Most Serene Republic. Puccini belonged to the Accademia Filarmonica of Bologna and was a skilled teacher. His musical style incorporated elements of both the Baroque and early Classic periods. Puccini was known as an excellent organist. He wrote many dramatic and sacred works, including a Te Deum for four voices and instruments, a Domine for four voices, masses, and psalm settings. Between 1733 and 1780, Puccini wrote 31 servizi ecclesiastici for the annual Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross (Festa della Esaltazione della Santa Croce). Some of Puccini's works, including a processional motet in eight voices, continued to be performed into at least the early 19th Century. A Requiem for eight voices by Puccini was performed at the Vienna Musical Exposition of 1892, together with music by his son Antonio, grandson Domenico, and great-grandson Michele.

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La confederazione dei Sabini con Roma, dramma per musica (1765). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 11 May 2018 21:21 
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Stefan Weisman is a composer living in New York City. Anthony Tommasini of The New York Times described his music as "personal, moody and skillfully wrought." When his song "Twinkie" was featured on the nationally syndicated program The Wendy Williams Show, the host said, "Very unique...You're not going to hear opera like this anywhere else...Fabulous!" His compositions include chamber, orchestral, theater, dance and choral pieces, and he has specialized in vocal works that explore edgy and compelling topics. His opera Darkling, commissioned by American Opera Projects, was included in the Guggenheim Museum's Works & Process series, premiered to great acclaim at the East 13th Street Theater and toured Europe in 2007. His one-act opera Fade, commissioned by the British opera company Second Movement, premiered in London in 2008 and also had successful performances in Philadelphia, San Francisco and Brooklyn. His evening length opera, The Scarlet Ibis, was premiered in the 2015 PROTOTYPE opera festival, produced by HERE and Beth Morrison Projects. The Wall Street Journal said it was "subtly subversive, and it's production groundbreaking." Among his other commissions are works for Bang on a Can, Sequitur, and the Empire City Men's Choir. Inside Jersey Magazine selected him as one of twenty-one artists from New Jersey who are "breaking big." He is a graduate of Bard College (BA), Yale University (MA), and Princeton University (PhD). His composition instructors include David Lang, Joan Tower, Daron Hagen, Martin Bresnick, Steven Mackey, and Paul Lansky. Presently, he is on the faculty of the Bard High School Early College in Queens, New York. He has also taught at Juilliard School’s Music Advancement Program, the City College of New York, CUNY, and the Princeton University Department of Music.

Darkling, ópera de cámara (2006). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 18 May 2018 21:28 
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Fritz Kreisler (1875-1962) Kreisler was born in Vienna, the son of Anna (her original Hebrew name, listed in her sons’ birth certificates was "Chaje Riwe" (rendered as "Chaje Ribe" in Hugo's record) (née Reaches) and Samuel Kreisler, a doctor. Of Jewish heritage, he was however baptised at the age of 12. He studied at the Vienna Conservatory and in Paris, where his teachers included Anton Bruckner, Léo Delibes, Jakob Dont, Joseph Hellmesberger Jr., Joseph Massart, and Jules Massenet. While there, he won the "Premier Grand Prix de Rome" gold medal at the age of 12, competing against 40 other players, all of whom were at least 20 years of age. He made his United States debut at the Steinway Hall in New York City on November 10, 1888, and his first tour of the United States in 1888–1889 with Moriz Rosenthal. He then returned to Austria and applied for a position in the Vienna Philharmonic, but was turned down by the concertmaster Arnold Rosé. As a result, he left music to study medicine. He spent a brief time in the army before returning to the violin in 1899, when he gave a concert with the Berlin Philharmonic conducted by Arthur Nikisch. It was this concert and a series of American tours from 1901 to 1903 that brought him real acclaim.

In 1910, Kreisler gave the premiere of Sir Edward Elgar's Violin Concerto, a work commissioned by and dedicated to him. He served briefly in the Austrian Army in World War I before being honourably discharged after he was wounded. He arrived in New York on November 24, 1914, and spent the remainder of the war in America. He returned to Europe in 1924, living first in Berlin, then moving to France in 1938. Shortly thereafter, at the outbreak of World War II, he settled once again in the United States, becoming a naturalized citizen in 1943. He lived there for the rest of his life, giving his last public concert in 1947, and broadcasting performances for a few years after that. On April 26, 1941, he was involved in a serious traffic accident. Struck by a truck while crossing a street in New York, he suffered a fractured skull and was in a coma for over a week. In his later years, he suffered from not only some hearing loss but also sight deterioration due to cataracts. Kreisler died of a heart condition aggravated by old age in New York City in 1962. He was interred in a private mausoleum in Woodlawn Cemetery, The Bronx, New York City.

Kreisler wrote a number of pieces for the violin, including solos for encores, such as Liebesleid and Liebesfreud. Some of Kreisler's compositions were pastiches ostensibly in the style of other composers. They were originally ascribed to earlier composers, such as Gaetano Pugnani, Giuseppe Tartini and Antonio Vivaldi, and then, in 1935, Kreisler revealed that it was he who wrote the pieces. When critics complained, Kreisler replied that they had already deemed the compositions worthy: "The name changes, the value remains", he said. He also wrote operettas, including Apple Blossoms in 1919 and Sissy in 1932, a String Quartet, and cadenzas, including ones for Brahms's D major violin concerto, Paganini's D major violin concerto, and Beethoven's D major violin concerto. His cadenzas for the Beethoven concerto are the ones most often played by violinists today. He wrote the music for the 1936 movie The King Steps Out directed by Josef von Sternberg, based on the early years of Empress Elisabeth of Austria.

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Sissy, opereta en dos actos (1932). Dein Kuß hat mir den Frühling gebracht.


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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 25 May 2018 20:38 
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Frans Fredric Eduard Brendler (1800−1831) He was born in Dresden. His claim to be a Swedish composer rests on the fact that his family moved to Stockholm when he was one year old! His father was musical, being a flautist with the Court Orchestra, so the young man was brought up in a musical environment. Although Eduard received musical training at his father's hands and learnt to play the flute, he furthered a career as a book-keeper on the island of Gotland. It was not until later in his life that he considered himself a professional musician, composer and teacher. After debuting with a series of piano pieces and songs, he had his breakthrough in 1830 with the oratorio, Spastaras död. In 1831 Brendler began composing the opera Ryno, however, his untimely death interrupted work on the piece that was then completed by Prince Oscar. Brendler was elected as a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Music in 1831.

Swedish Musical Heritage

Ryno, ópera en tres actos (1831). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 02 Jun 2018 21:44 
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Nicola (Antonio) Porpora (1686-1768) Porpora was born in Naples. He graduated from the music conservatory Poveri di Gesù Cristo of his native city, where the civic opera scene was dominated by Alessandro Scarlatti. Porpora's first opera, Agrippina, was successfully performed at the Neapolitan court in 1708. His second, Berenice, was performed at Rome. In a long career, he followed these up by many further operas, supported as maestro di cappella in the households of aristocratic patrons, such as the commander of military forces at Naples, prince Philip of Hesse-Darmstadt, or of the Portuguese ambassador at Rome, for composing operas alone did not yet make a viable career. However, his enduring fame rests chiefly upon his unequalled power of teaching singing. At the Neapolitan Conservatorio di Sant'Onofrio and with the Poveri di Gesù Cristo he trained Farinelli, Caffarelli, Salimbeni, and other celebrated vocalists, during the period 1715 to 1721. In 1720 and 1721 he wrote two serenades to libretti by a gifted young poet, Metastasio, the beginning of a long, though interrupted, collaboration. In 1722 his operatic successes encouraged him to lay down his conservatory commitments.

After a rebuff from the court of Charles VI at Vienna in 1725, Porpora settled mostly in Venice, composing and teaching regularly in the schools of La Pietà and the Incurabili. In 1729 the anti-Handel clique invited him to London to set up an opera company as a rival to Handel's, without success, and in the 1733–1734 season, even the presence of his pupil, the great Farinelli, failed to save the dramatic company in Lincoln's Inn Fields (the "Opera of the Nobility") from bankruptcy. An interval as Kapellmeister at the Dresden court of the Elector of Saxony and Polish King Augustus from 1748 ended in strained relations with his rival in Venice and Rome, the hugely successful opera composer Johann Adolph Hasse and his wife, the prima donna Faustina, and resulted in Porpora's departure in 1752. From Dresden he went to Vienna, where among other pupils he trained the young Marianne von Martinez, a future composer. As his accompanist and valet he hired the youthful Joseph Haydn, who was making his way in Vienna as a struggling freelancer. Haydn later remembered Porpora thus: "There was no lack of Asino, Coglione, Birbante [ass, cullion, rascal], and pokes in the ribs, but I put up with it all, for I profited greatly from Porpora in singing, in composition, and in the Italian language." He also said that he had learned from the maestro "the true fundamentals of composition".

In 1753 Porpora spent three summer months, with Haydn in tow, at the spa town Mannersdorf am Leithagebirge. His function there was to continue the singing lessons of the mistress of the ambassador of Venice to the Austrian Empire, Pietro Correr. Porpora returned in 1759 to Naples. From this time Porpora's career was a series of misfortunes: his florid style was becoming old-fashioned, his last opera, Camilla, failed, his pension from Dresden stopped, and he became so poor that the expenses of his funeral were paid by a subscription concert. Yet at the moment of his death, Farinelli and Caffarelli were living in splendid retirement on fortunes largely based on the excellence of the old maestro's teaching. A good linguist, who was admired for the idiomatic fluency of his recitatives, and a man of considerable literary culture, Porpora was also celebrated for his conversational wit. He was well-read in Latin and Italian literature, wrote poetry and spoke French, German and English.

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Germanico in Germania, ópera seria en tres actos. Aria del acto primero: Se sposa d’un Romano. Terzetto del acto segundo: Temi lo sdegno mio, perfido traditore.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 02 Jun 2018 21:46 
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Esa fue la viñeta No. 500. :coro:

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 08 Jun 2018 21:08 
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Clément Philibert Léo Delibes (1836-1891) He was born in Saint-Germain-du-Val, now part of La Flèche (Sarthe), France. His father was a mailman, and his mother a talented amateur musician. His grandfather had been an opera singer. He was raised mainly by his mother and uncle following his father's early death. In 1871, at the age of 35, the composer married Léontine Estelle Denain. His brother Michel Delibes migrated to Spain; he was the grandfather of Spanish writer Miguel Delibes. Starting in 1847, Delibes studied composition at the Paris Conservatoire as a student of Adolphe Adam. A year later he began taking voice lessons, though he would end up a much better organ player than singer. He held positions as a rehearsal accompanist and chorus master at the Théâtre Lyrique, as second chorus master at the Paris Opéra (in 1864), and as organist at Saint-Pierre-de-Chaillot (1865–1871). The first of his many operettas was Deux sous de charbon, ou Le suicide de Bigorneau ("Two sous-worth of coal"), written in 1856 for the Folies-Nouvelles. A ceremonial cantata, Algers, for Napoleon III on the theme of Algiers, brought him to official attention; a collaboration with Léon Minkus resulted, in which his contribution of an act's worth of musical numbers for a ballet La source (1866) brought him into the milieu of ballet. In 1867 Delibes composed the divertissement Le jardin animé for a revival of the Joseph Mazilier/Adolphe Adam ballet Le corsaire. He wrote a mass, his Messe brève, and composed operettas almost yearly and occasional music for the theater, such as dances and antique airs for Victor Hugo's Le roi s'amuse, the play that Verdi turned into Rigoletto.

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L'Omelette à la Follembuche, opereta en un acto (1859). Fragmento.

Le serpent à plumes, farsa en un acto (1864). Fragmento.

Le roi l'a dit, ópera cómica en tres actos (1873). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 14 Jun 2018 15:41 
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Clément Philibert Léo Delibes (1836-1891) He was born in Saint-Germain-du-Val, now part of La Flèche (Sarthe), France. His father was a mailman, and his mother a talented amateur musician. His grandfather had been an opera singer. He was raised mainly by his mother and uncle following his father's early death. In 1871, at the age of 35, the composer married Léontine Estelle Denain. His brother Michel Delibes migrated to Spain; he was the grandfather of Spanish writer Miguel Delibes. Starting in 1847, Delibes studied composition at the Paris Conservatoire as a student of Adolphe Adam. A year later he began taking voice lessons, though he would end up a much better organ player than singer. He held positions as a rehearsal accompanist and chorus master at the Théâtre Lyrique, as second chorus master at the Paris Opéra (in 1864), and as organist at Saint-Pierre-de-Chaillot (1865–1871). The first of his many operettas was Deux sous de charbon, ou Le suicide de Bigorneau ("Two sous-worth of coal"), written in 1856 for the Folies-Nouvelles. A ceremonial cantata, Algers, for Napoleon III on the theme of Algiers, brought him to official attention; a collaboration with Léon Minkus resulted, in which his contribution of an act's worth of musical numbers for a ballet La source (1866) brought him into the milieu of ballet. In 1867 Delibes composed the divertissement Le jardin animé for a revival of the Joseph Mazilier/Adolphe Adam ballet Le corsaire. He wrote a mass, his Messe brève, and composed operettas almost yearly and occasional music for the theater, such as dances and antique airs for Victor Hugo's Le roi s'amuse, the play that Verdi turned into Rigoletto.

Wikipedia

L'Omelette à la Follembuche, opereta en un acto (1859). Fragmento.

Le serpent à plumes, farsa en un acto (1864). Fragmento.

Le roi l'a dit, ópera cómica en tres actos (1873). Fragmento.

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Pero conocido sobre todo por: Lakmé.

Óperas:
Le boeuf Apis (1865)
La cour du roi Pétaud (1869)
Le roi l’a dit (1873)
Jean de Nivelle (1880)
Lakmé (1883)
Kassya (1893, op. póstuma)


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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 15 Jun 2018 20:49 
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Sigmund Romberg (1887-1951) Romberg was born in Hungary as Siegmund Rosenberg to a Jewish family, Adam and Clara Rosenberg, in Gross-Kanizsa (Hungarian: Nagykanizsa) during the Austro-Hungarian kaiserlich und königlich (Imperial and Royal) monarchy period. In 1889 Romberg and his family moved to Belišće, which was then in Hungary, where he attended a primary school. Influenced by his father, Romberg learned to play the violin at six, and piano at eight years of age. He enrolled at Osijek gymnasium in 1897, where he was a member of the high school orchestra. He went to Vienna to study engineering, but he also took composition lessons while living there. In June 1909, he boarded the S/S Oceanic as a second-class cabin passenger, sailing from the Port of Southampton, England to the Port of New York. After a brief stint working in a pencil factory in New York, he was employed as a pianist in cafés and restaurants.

He eventually founded his own orchestra and published a few songs, which, despite their limited success, brought him to the attention of the Shubert brothers, who in 1914 hired him to write music for their Broadway theatre shows. That year he wrote his first successful Broadway revue, The Whirl of the World. He then contributed songs to several American musical adaptations of Viennese operettas, including the successful The Blue Paradise (1915). Even more successful was the musical Maytime, in 1917. Both involved love across generations and included nostalgic waltzes, along with more modern American dance music. At the same time, Romberg contributed songs to the Shuberts' popular revues The Passing Show of 1916 and The Passing Show of 1918 and to two vehicles for Al Jolson: Robinson Crusoe, Jr. (1916), an extravaganza burlesque on the familiar story, and Sinbad (1918), an Arabian Nights-themed musical. Romberg wrote another Jolson vehicle in 1921, Bombo. He wrote the music for the musical comedy Poor Little Ritz Girl, which also had songs by Richard Rodgers.

Romberg's adaptation of melodies by Franz Schubert for Blossom Time (1921, produced in the UK as Lilac Time) was a great success. He subsequently wrote his best-known operettas, The Student Prince (1924), The Desert Song (1926) and The New Moon (1928), which are in a style similar to the Viennese operettas of Franz Lehár. He also wrote Princess Flavia (1925), an operetta based on The Prisoner of Zenda. His other works, My Maryland (1927), a successful romance; Rosalie (1928), together with George Gershwin; and May Wine (1935), with lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, about a blackmail plot; and Up in Central Park (1945), are closer to the American musical in style. Romberg also wrote a number of film scores and adapted his own work for film.

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Blossom Time, opereta en tres actos (1921). Fragmento.

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The Student Prince, opereta en cuatro actos (1924). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 22 Jun 2018 20:04 
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Scott Wheeler (*1952) He was born in Washington, D.C., now based in Boston, Massachusetts. Since 1989, he has been on the faculty of Emerson College in Boston, where he has co-directed the music theater program. Wheeler co-founded (with Rodney Lister and Ezra Sims) and for many years was artistic director of the Dinosaur Annex Music Ensemble, of which he remains artistic adviser. As an active conductor and an advocate for the music of his colleagues, he has led numerous world and local premieres and recorded several compact discs. Wheeler is on the board of directors of the Virgil Thomson Foundation, a composer advocacy group. He attended Amherst College, the New England Conservatory, and Brandeis University and counts Virgil Thomson among his teachers. He was also a Fellow of the Tanglewood Music Center and in 1988 was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. Scott Wheeler is best known as the composer of vocal and theater music. In February 2006, he was one of several composers selected as part of the Metropolitan Opera/Lincoln Center Theater commissioning project for a new operatic work. Wheeler collaborates with his librettist, the playwright Romulus Linney. This project is ongoing as of fall 2010. His major dramatic works include his opera Democracy, An American Comedy, written in collaboration with Linney on commission from Washington National Opera. Democracy premiered at Kennedy Center in 2005. His dramatic cantata The Construction of Boston (1988), setting a libretto by the poet Kenneth Koch (1925–2002), was recorded for the Naxos Records label by the Boston Cecilia. That piece was commissioned by the John Oliver Chorale and was premiered in 1989.

Wheeler has written music in most concert genres from solo pieces to orchestral. Commissions have come from such groups and organizations as the Koussevitzky Foundation, the Fromm Foundation, the Minnesota Orchestra, Boston Cecilia, and Sequitur, among many others. His Sunday Songs, two songs on texts of Emily Dickinson, were premiered by soprano Renée Fleming in 2000 at New York’s Alice Tully Hall. Recent works include his Heaven and Earth, settings of William Blake's works commissioned by the Marilyn Horne Foundation, which was premiered at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall in 2008, and the chamber symphony City of Shadows, commissioned by the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin and Kent Nagano as part of a portrait concert of Wheeler’s work. His piano trio The Granite Coast, commissioned by the Rockport Chamber Music Society (Rockport, MA) for the opening of their new Shalin Liu Performance Center, was premiered in Rockport in June 2010. Wheeler’s particular concern as a composer is vocal and dramatic music. As such, he has a wide knowledge of and interest in poetry, and in addition to Kenneth Koch, he has set texts from authors ranging from St. Theresa of Avila to Wallace Stevens and Mark Van Doren. His vocal settings evoke natural speech rhythms and contours, called by Boston Globe critic Jeremy Eichler “transparent and elegant.

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The Construction of Boston, ópera en un acto (1988). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 29 Jun 2018 21:06 
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Detlev Müller-Siemens (*1957) Nació en Hamburgo y estudió composición y teoría en la Musikhochschule Hamburg bajo la dirección de Günter Friedrichs y György Ligeti (1973-1980) y el conservatorio de París con Olivier Messiaen (1977-1978). También estudió dirección con Christoph von Dohnányi y Klauspeter Seibel. En 1981 regresa a París como director asistente en la Opéra National de Paris para Le Grand Macabre de György Ligeti . De 1986 a 1988 fue Kapellmeister de la Städtischen Bühnen en Friburgo. Ha sido galardonado con numerosos premios y becas por sus óperas, obras para orquesta y música de cámara, incluido el premio de música Schneider-Schott en 1986 y el premio Rolf-Liebermann por su ópera Die Menschen en 1990. De 1991 a 2005 enseñó composición y teoría de la música en la Musikhochschule de Basilea. Desde 2005 es profesor de composición en la Universität für Musik und darstellende Kunst en Viena.

Die Menschen, ópera en dos actos (1989–1990). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 06 Jul 2018 21:48 
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Giulio Ricordi (1840-1912) He was born in Milan. Nineteenth century editor but also writer and patron of the arts. Under his leadership the Ricordi family’s publishing house, that was founded by his grandfather (Giovanni Ricordi) in 1808, achieved great success. When Giulio entered Ricordi the company took on a new role, becoming a vibrant centre of contemporary art. However, before moving too quickly to the end of the story it is interesting to run through the phases which led the famous Milanese editor to the debut of his artistic works. Initially, Giulio did not work in the family business: for a period he was in Turin for as a voluntary bombardier in the war of independence, fighting under Cialdini and gaining two medals of honour. Upon his return to Milan in 1862 he married Giuditta Brivio and had four children. In 1863 he entered the family company, dedicating himself to the institution founded by his grandfather but still continuing to nurture his artistic vein.

From this moment onwards, and especially during his youth, writing became part of his artistic output. He collaborated with the “Gazzetta” and wrote his first volume “Primavera della Vita” (The Spring of Life) in which the writer narrated his years spent in the army. However, from writing he soon passed to pictorial and musical compositions. He composed his first Mazurka for pianoforte in 1853 and, in 1856, Fantasia sulla Guzman, a melodic study for pianoforte. These limitless creative talents were the reason why Giulio achieved so much and became a very well esteemed journalist. During this period his father Tito republished the Gazzetta Musicale di Milano for him, published since 1842 by his grandfather and, from 1888 onwards, he took over the administration of the company. On November 18th 1902 he purchased the Alessandro Pigna business in Milan and successively extended the company to various branches obtaining official recognition. He opened branches in Naples (1864), Florence (1865), Rome (1871), London (1878), Palermo and Paris (1888).

Turismo Milano

La Secchia Rapita, ópera cómica en tres actos (1910). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 13 Jul 2018 21:27 
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Robert Livingstone Aldridge (*1954) He was born in Richmond, Virginia. Aldridge holds degrees in both composition and English literature. Aldridge received a bachelor's degree in English Literature from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a master's degree in Composition from the New England Conservatory of Music, and a doctorate in Composition from the Yale School of Music in 2000. In November 2007, an opera titled Elmer Gantry by Robert Aldridge and with a libretto by Herschel Garfein premiered in the James K. Polk Theater in Nashville. Parables also with a libretto by Herschel Garfein was a work commissioned by the Topeka Symphony. It premiered in May 2010. He was professor of Composition at Montclair State University in New Jersey. He was appointed director of the music department of the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University in 2012.

Elmer Gantry, ópera en tres actos (2007). Del acto primero: Sweetheart? Eddie? What are you doing?.

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Sister Carrie, ópera en dos actos (2012). Del acto segundo: Are you ready?.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 20 Jul 2018 22:23 
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Peter Joseph von Lindpaintner (1791–1856) He was born in Koblenz. As a small child, Lindpaintner, whose father was a tenor at the court of the Bishop-Elector of Trier, accompanied the court into exile in Augsburg after the French secularization of Trier. In 1806 the elector arranged for him to study composition with Peter Winter in Munich. Though Winter was an ineffective teacher, Lindpaintner made progress in composition, and his first opera, Demophoon, was successfully performed in Munich in 1811. The following year he became music director at the Isartortheater, and over the next six years produced another eight operas, of which the most successful were Der blinde Gärtner (?1813), Die Sternkönigin (1815), Pervonte (1816) and Die Rosenmädchen (1818). Schilling relates that he became complacent about his abilities during this period but that, having been convinced by an old friend that he had much more to learn, he resumed the study of composition, with the contrapuntist Joseph Graetz.

In 1819 Lindpaintner took up the post of Kapellmeister at Stuttgart, where he remained for the rest of his life. Here he established his reputation as one of the finest German conductors and continued to compose assiduously for the stage. A number of his operas were enthusiastically received, though few held the stage for long. Der Bergkönig (1825) and Der Vampyr (1828), which appeared in the same year as Marschner’s more striking opera of the same name, responded to the burgeoning enthusiasm for supernatural subjects treated in the manner of Spohr and Weber, though they did not achieve equal popularity. Schilling observed in 1837: ‘Unfortunately their texts are mostly of too little dramatic worth to allow his operas to obtain the recognition by the wider musical public that their musical worth deserves’. His comic opera Die Macht des Liedes (1836) and his later grand operas Die sicilianische Vesper (1843) and Lichtenstein (1846) gained moderate acclaim. Some of his ballet music (Aglaja, Zephyr und Rose and Zeila) and incidental music, to works such as Schiller’s Der Lied von der Glocke, achieved a more lasting success.

Lindpaintner also enjoyed a reputation as a composer of lieder, sacred music and instrumental works. His songs, particularly Die Fahenwacht and Roland, were widely popular; among his sacred music, which included cantatas, masses and psalms, the oratorio Der Jüngling von Nain held a high place. His concertos and concertinos were notably successful, especially the two concertante symphonies for five wind instruments and orchestra. Lindpaintner’s mastery of instrumentation was widely acknowledged, and his reorchestration of Handel’s Judas Maccabeus was seen as one of his finest works. Lindpaintner’s achievements were acknowledged by the bestowal of the aristocratic ‘von’ in 1844, but in his later years his reputation as a composer declined. In 1854 Hans von Bülow castigated ‘the supreme impropriety of the pretensions with which Kapellmeister Lindpaintner now represents himself as the old master of the departing epoch, forgetting that Spohr alone can bear this honour’.

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Die sicilianische Vesper, ópera en cuatro actos (1843). Del acto cuarto: Qua porto un vitto misero.

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