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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 22 Nov 2019 17:19 
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Alva Henderson (*1940) He was born in California. Henderson entered San Francisco State College as a Drama major, but after several years changed to a major in Composition with voice as his principal instrument. He studied composition with Wayne Peterson (SF State) and Robert Sheldon (SF Conservatory). Before leaving the college in 1966 to pursue a career in music, he presented a complete recital of original works. During the following four years he completed his first opera Medea while supporting himself by singing in the San Francisco Opera Chorus. The 1972 production of Medea by the San Diego Opera with Metropolitan Opera star Irene Dalis in the title role brought him to national attention. A commission from Opera Delaware to create an opera for the American Bicentennial and for the gala reopening of the restored Grand Opera House in Wilmington followed, and The Last of the Mohicans was premiered there in 1976. The production was met with much critical success, acclaimed by Opera News for its “a pulsing sense of melody and stirring emotional commitment.” The following year the work was produced by the Lake George Opera Festival and broadcast throughout the country on National Public Radio. Among his other compositions are the operas West of Washington Square, premiered by Opera San Jose in 1988, Achilles (unproduced) the cantata The Ancient Ones, premiered by the Schola Cantorum in 1983, and a dramatic musical, Far From the Madding Crowd.

In June of 1998, Henderson was composer in residence at the Western Slope Summer Music Festival. One hour of excerpts from his opera Nosferatu were performed (with full orchestra conducted by Imre Pallo) to great acclaim. In June of 2004, Schola Cantorum, a San Francisco Bay area chorus of 140 voices gave the premiere of Henderson’s Winter Requiem, poems by Dana Gioia. The work was performed at St. Joseph’s Church in San Jose, and in San Francisco at St. Ignatius Church. Also in 2004, Henderson’s opera Nosferatu, with libretto by Dana Gioia (after the film by F. W. Murnau) was given its world premiere first at by the Rimrock Opera in Billings, Montana, followed by performances in by Opera Boise in Boise, Idaho. Henderson has written many songs, song cycles and choruses as well as incidental music for Twelfth Night and The House of Bernarda Alba and Much Ado About Nothing. Recitals of his music have been performed at the Kaiser Center in Oakland, California, the Burlingame Music School, The San Francisco Conservatory of Music, The Renee Weiler Concert Hall in New York City, and Mercer University, Macon Georgia. In celebration of his 70th birthday, a recital of 26 of his art songs was performed at the Tateuchi Recital Hall in Mountain View in April 2010. Mr. Henderson has been a Fellow at Yaddo and The Djerassi Foundation and Distinguished Artist in Residence at San Jose State University. He makes his home in Mountain View, California with his spouse, Bear Capron.

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Nosferatu, ópera en dos actos (1994). Dies Irae.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 29 Nov 2019 15:12 
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Giuseppe Zelioli (1880-1949) Nació en Caravaggio, Bergamo. Aprendió los rudimentos de su padre, Pietro Gaetano Zelioli (1844-1917). A la edad de nueve años se convirtió en organista de Casirate d'Adda, en la zona baja de Brianza. Su debut público fue en Caravaggio en 1902 para las celebraciones en honor de Michele Angelo Merisio, Caravaggio, para quien compuso el Canto a Michelangelo para coro, solistas y dos pianos que él mismo dirigió tocando el piano. En 1904 fue nombrado organista de la Basílica de Lecco, ciudad donde pasó el resto de su vida. A lo largo de este período su actividad fue vasta e intensa; Organista, pianista, maestro, compositor de obras sacras y profanas, y piezas para piano.

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Il Buon Pastore, ópera sacra en un acto y dos cuadros. Parte seconda


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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 06 Dic 2019 15:43 
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Thomas Hyde (*1978) Born in London, Thomas Hyde studied at Oxford University and the Royal Academy of Music where his teachers included Robert Saxton, Simon Bainbridge and Sir Peter Maxwell Davies. He was Manson Junior Fellow at the Royal Academy of Music (2001-2002) and in 2017 was elected an Associate of the RAM. He has supported his compositional work with various part-time teaching posts. He has taught at City University London and is currently on the staff of the music department at King’s College, London. In June 2019 he was elected to a Senior Research Fellowship at Worcester College, Oxford where he has also taught for a number of years. As well as his composing and teaching commitments, Thomas Hyde is chair of the Lucille Graham Trust, a charity that supports music education work in London, and a member of the Little Missenden Festival committee and Presteigne Festival Advisory Group. As a writer he has recently completed a biography of the Welsh composer William Mathias and his study of David Matthews was published by Plumbago Books in 2014.

That Man Stephen Ward, a one-man opera (2006-2007). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 13 Dic 2019 15:08 
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Michael Hirsch (1958-2017) He was born in Munich and has lived in Berlin since 1981. He has worked as a composer since 1976, with occasional interruptions for theater engagements. Hirsch’s compositions have been performed at international festivals such as the Donaueschingen Festival, the Witten Days for New Chamber Music, Musica Viva in Munich, Cigle de música del segle XX Barcelona; the MaerzMusik, Musik-Biennale, and Ultraschall festivals in Berlin; the Florida Festival of Electroacoustic Music, Seoul International Computer Music Festival, and the ECLAT new music festival in Stuttgart. Michael Hirsch’s works include chamber and vocal music, speech compositions, music for orchestra, and various types of opera and music theater. In May 2000, his full-length opera Das stille Zimmer was premiered by the Bielefeld Opera, which also commissioned the work. In 2003, his short opera La Didone abbandonata was written for the Dresden Days for Contemporary Music. In 2005, the chamber opera Eines schönen Tages was commissioned and premiered by the opera in Hanover and the chamber opera Die Klage des Pleberio was premiered in Berlin. A further short opera Celestina im Gespräch mit sich selbst was written for the Dresden Days for Contemporary Music in 2006, and in 2007 Hirsch composed for the Stuttgart Opera Stationendrama, which was performed in a moving subway train. 2008–2009 saw the premieres of the large vocal and symphonic work Worte Steine for baritone, choir, and large orchestra, as well as the madrigal opera Tragicomedia, written for the Stuttgart Neue Vocalsolisten and premiered at the ECLAT festival in Stuttgart in 2009. Michael Hirsch is honoured with the Elisabeth Schneider Composition Prize 2001 and the Busoni Composition Prize 2005 of the Academy of Arts in Berlin. In 2008, he received a residence fellowship at the Villa Serpentara in Olevano Romano, Italy. Since 2002 his complete works are published by Edition Juliane Klein, Berlin.

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La Didone abbandonata, Kurzoper (2003). La Didone abbandonata.

Tragicomedia, Kurzoper (2008). Comienzo.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 20 Dic 2019 22:57 
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Charles-Hubert Gervais (1671-1744) The son of Jeanne Mercier and Hubert Gervais, who was garçon de la chambre to the Duke of Orléans (brother of Louis XIV), he was born and grew up in the Palais Royal in Paris, where he probably studied music with the duke's musicians. He may also have been a page in the choir school of his parish of St Eustache. From 1697 he was ordinaire de la musique to Philippe de Bourbon, Duke of Chartres (who became Duke of Orléans in 1701 and Regent of France in 1715), and succeeded Sieur de Sablières in the position of maître de musique de la chambre in 1700. He was subsequently made intendant (perhaps in 1701) and then surintendant (perhaps in 1722). In this capacity he taught music to the Duke of Chartres, who had a great love of Italian music, and helped him to compose two operas, Penthée (c1703) and Suite d'Armide, ou Jérusalem délivrée (c1704). On 18 October 1701 Gervais married Françoise du Vivier (d1732), who bore him three children. He succeeded his father as garçon de la chambre on 24 April 1702 and retained that appointment until his death (he seems to have lost his post as surintendant when the regent died). Gervais had his first public successes with his opera Hypermnestre (1716) and his ballet Les amours de Protée (1720). In January 1723, at the regent's request, Michel-Richard de Lalande officially relinquished three of his four three-month terms of duty as sous-maître of the Chapelle Royale. The three posts were then redistributed, on a non-competitive basis, to André Campra, Nicolas Bernier and Gervais. In 1726 Lalande's position fell vacant on his death, and his duties were shared between the remaining sous-maîtres. When Bernier died in 1734 Campra and Gervais carried out this work on their own until 1738, when Henri Madin and Antoine Blanchard were appointed to help them. Several of Gervais's motets were enthusiastically received at the Concert Spirituel between 1736 and 1738, and five continued to be sung at Versailles until 1792.

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Hypermnestre, tragédie en musique (1716). Del acto primero: Chantons de ce héros la valeur et la gloire. Del acto segundo: Hâte-toi de quitter les cieux.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 27 Dic 2019 18:22 
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Per August Ölander (1824-1886) He was born in the Swedish town of Linköping. His early music lessons were with his father a violinist and parish organist. He attended the University of Uppsala and although he took some music lessons from the school’s music director, it was not his main area of study. Because it was virtually impossible for musicians in Sweden during this time to earn a living solely through music, like so many others, he supported himself by means of working in an entirely different area unrelated to music. He served for most of his life as a officer in the customs office. He did not ignore music altogether, working as a violinist and music critic. He played second violin in a prominent string quartet and may have had a few composition lessons from the first violinist but was largely self-taught as a composer. Hence, it was quite surprising when his opera Blenda won the first prize in the 1876 Royal Competition by acclamation; the jury were unanimous. He was not a prolific composer writing just the one opera, a few other vocal works, this string sextet and several string quartets.

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Blenda, ópera en cuatro actos (1876). Del acto segundo: Långt sill målet ej vi hunnit.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 28 Dic 2019 2:58 
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Acabo de terminar la escucha de esta ópera. Me ha encantado. Se la recomiendo encarecidamente a todos los amantes del Barroco Francés (bueno, y a todos los que puedan prescindir al menos un rato del sota, caballo y rey).


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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 28 Dic 2019 10:59 
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delaforce escribió:
Acabo de terminar la escucha de esta ópera. Me ha encantado. Se la recomiendo encarecidamente a todos los amantes del Barroco Francés (bueno, y a todos los que puedan prescindir al menos un rato del sota, caballo y rey).
Gracias por pensar en mí. Lo mismo hago el esfuerzo, quién sabe...

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Cuidado con tragarse las óperas de Wagner: son de difícil digestión.


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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 28 Dic 2019 13:59 
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Precisamente, estaba pensando en cualquiera menos usted, que es fiel al SCR hasta los confines del Universo conocido, y el final de los tiempos.


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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 29 Dic 2019 0:09 
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delaforce escribió:
Acabo de terminar la escucha de esta ópera. Me ha encantado. Se la recomiendo encarecidamente a todos los amantes del Barroco Francés (bueno, y a todos los que puedan prescindir al menos un rato del sota, caballo y rey).


Esa, y nada mas esa, es la razón de la existencia de este hilo. Hay tanto por descubrir, tanto por disfrutar. :D

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 29 Dic 2019 15:01 
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De hecho esta intención convierte este hilo en el más interesante de este foro. Para mí está siendo un pozo sin fondo para el conocimiento de compositores y óperas prácticamente desconocidas.


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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 03 Ene 2020 19:01 
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Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924) He was born in Dublin. The only child of John James Stanford, one of Dublin's most eminent lawyers, and his second wife, Mary (née Henn), who also originated from a distinguished Irish legal family, Stanford grew up in a highly stimulating cultural and intellectual environment made up of his father's friends, most of whom emanated from the ecclesiastical, medical or judicial professions. His home, at 2 Herbert Street, was the meeting-place of numerous amateur and professional musicians – his father, a capable singer and cellist, among them – and on various occasions celebrities such as Joachim came to the house. At Henry Tilney Bassett's school Stanford's education was firmly rooted in the classics (which later formed the basis of his degree at Cambridge), while his musical training consisted of tuition on the violin, piano and organ. In composition Stanford showed early promise and came under the influence of Dublin's most prominent musicians: Robert Stewart, Joseph Robinson and Michael Quarry (a pupil of Moscheles). In the province of church and organ music he learnt much from the example of Stewart; he admired the conducting skills of Robinson; and from Quarry he gained an invaluable insight into the music of Bach, Schumann and Brahms which supplemented his already wide knowledge of Handel and Mendelssohn. Later, in 1862, he became a composition pupil of Arthur O'Leary in London, where he also took piano lessons from Ernst Pauer.

In 1870 he gained the consent of his father (who had originally wished him to enter the legal profession) to pursue a career in music. The same year he won an organ scholarship at Queens' College, Cambridge, and in June 1871 gained a classical scholarship. Even before Cambridge Stanford had begun to show a prodigious ability in composition, producing church music, songs and partsongs, and orchestral works including a Rondo for cello and orchestra (1869, written for Wilhelm Elsner) and a Concert Overture (1870). At Cambridge this energy remained unabated: he composed an incidental score for Longfellow's play A Spanish Student (1871), a Piano Concerto in B, evening services in F and E and more songs. Moreover, after being elected assistant conductor to the Cambridge University Musical Society (CUMS) in 1871 to assist the ailing John Larkin Hopkins, he was appointed conductor in May 1873. Perhaps inevitably a conflict emerged between his preoccupation for music and his degree studies, which he at times threatened to abandon. In 1873 he moved to Trinity College, where, after Hopkins's death, he was appointed organist in February 1874. As part of the agreement of his appointment at Trinity, Stanford was able to spend the last six months of both 1874 and 1875 in Leipzig, where he studied the piano with Robert Papperitz and composition with Reinecke. Though he composed prolifically during this period – one which included two choral works, The Resurrection and The Golden Legend, a Piano Trio (now lost), some fine songs to words by Heine and a Violin Concerto for Guido Papini – the time passed with Reinecke was, according to Stanford, unprofitable. On Joachim's recommendation he went to Berlin for the last half of 1876 to work with Friedrich Kiel, an association that proved to be much happier.

By the time he returned to Cambridge in January 1877 Stanford had already established his name in British music with the Piano Suite op.2 and Toccata op.3 (both published by Chappell in 1875), the First Symphony (which won second prize in the Alexandra Palace competition in 1876) and incidental music for Tennyson's play Queen Mary (1876). He attempted to combine this flair for composition with his energy for organization and his abilities as a performer and conductor. He rapidly brought the CUMS into prominence with first English performances of Brahms's works, including the First Symphony (conducted by Joachim), the Neue Liebeslieder waltzes and the Alto Rhapsody; he introduced a number of his own works, such as the Second Symphony, Psalm XLVI (op.8) and the Piano Quintet, and figured frequently as pianist in CUMS ‘Popular Concerts’ of chamber music. In addition he was highly successful in attracting major artists to Cambridge, namely Hans Richter, Joachim, Piatti, Dannreuther, Hermann Franke and Robert Hausmann as well as native composers, including Parry, Cowen, Goving Thomas and Mackenzie. As organist at Trinity he was equally active, though, as he claimed later (in a paper to the Church Congress in 1899), more constrained by clerical authority. He undertook to continue the regular series of organ recitals (initiated by Hopkins) and raised their profile through the invitation of important performers such as Walter Parratt, Basil Harwood, Frederick Bridge and C.H. Lloyd. The standard of the chapel choir also rose markedly, a fact underlined by the production of some highly distinctive church music such as the Service in B (op.10), the anthem The Lord is my shepherd (1886) and the motet Justorum animae (1888). In 1887, at the age of 35, he was appointed professor of music at Cambridge, an office he used effectively to help augment the status of the university's MusB degree by the introduction (in 1893) of residence as a condition of supplication. His relationship with Cambridge was not altogether happy. He resigned his post as organist at Trinity in 1892, though he continued as conductor of CUMS until 1893 in order to oversee the society's jubilee celebrations, an occasion which brought Tchaikovsky, Saint-Saëns, Boito and Bruch to the university to receive honorary doctorates.

In 1883 he joined the staff of the newly inaugurated RCM as professor of composition and conductor of the orchestra. In both areas he exerted considerable influence, though it is for the impressive list of pupils such as Benjamin, Frank Bridge, Butterworth, Coleridge-Taylor, Dyson, Gurney, Howells, Hurlstone, Ireland, Moeran and Vaughan Williams that he is best remembered. One other substantial contribution to life at the RCM was the instigation of the opera class, an initiative which soon led to an annual production. Stanford's enthusiasm for opera is demonstrated by his lifelong commitment to a genre in which he enjoyed varying success: several of his operas, The Veiled Prophet of Khorassan (first performed at Hanover, 1881), Savonarola (1884, Hamburg), Shamus O'Brien (1896, London) and Much Ado about Nothing (1901, London), enjoyed a modicum of national and international recognition (Shamus O'Brien was also performed at the Broadway Theatre, New York, on 5 January 1897), while his two last and arguably best operas, The Critic (1916) and The Travelling Companion (1919), had still not attracted the attention of professional opera companies by the mid-1990s. Such persistence reflected his profound belief in opera as the vital catalyst in Britain's musical renaissance. He proselytized untiringly for a national opera (especially in his essay ‘The Case for National Opera’, in Studies and Memories, 1908) and spearheaded a petition to the London County Council in 1898. Regrettably the venture failed, although he persisted until his death in fighting the cause through articles and letters to the newspapers. Besides conducting at the RCM and CUMS, Stanford was also conductor of the Bach Choir (1886–1902), the Leeds Philharmonic Society (1897–1909) and the Leeds Triennial Festival (1901–1910), while also appearing occasionally for the Philharmonic Society. He received many honours, including honorary degrees from Oxford (DMus 1883), Cambridge (MusD 1888), Durham (DCL 1894) and Leeds (LLD 1904). He was knighted in 1902.

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The Travelling Companion, ópera en cuatro actos (1916). Fragmento.

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Giovanni Battista Lampugnani (c 1708-1788) Nacido en Milán en el seno de una familia acomodada, Giovanni recibió una esmerada educación musical en su ciudad natal. El 26 de diciembre de 1732 se representó su primera ópera Candace, en el Teatro Regio Ducal de Milán y a continuación viajó durante varios años a lo largo y ancho de Italia para representar sus óperas en los teatros más prestigiosos. En 1738 fue contratado como compositor de música sacra en el Ospedale della Pietà de Venecia. En 1743 sustituyó a Baldassare Galuppi como compositor del Teatro Real Nacional de Londres, debutando el 15 de noviembre con un pastiche titulado Rossane, que era un arreglo del Alessandro (1726) de Händel. A continuación estrenó las óperas serias Alfonso y Alceste, ambas en (1744) y ese mismo año decidió regresar a Italia, siendo sustituido en su puesto de Londres por Gluck. Después de su regreso de Inglaterra, entre los años 1745 y 1751, Lampugnani realizó una segunda gira por los principales teatros de Italia para presentar sus nuevos trabajos, así en 1745 estrenó en Padua Semiramide; en 1746 Il gran Tamerlano en Milán; en 1748 Andromaca en Turín; en 1751 Alessandro sotto le tende di Dario en Piacenza, etc.

En 1753 marchó nuevamente al extranjero, concretamente a Barcelona, para presentar su Vologeso; y en 1755 otra vez a Londres donde estrenó el 14 de enero Siroe, re di Persia. Antes de su regreso a Italia probablemente permaneció durante algún tiempo en Alemania, hasta 1758 en que fue nombrado clavecinista del Teatro Regio Ducal de Milán donde presentó Il re pastore, su primera ópera bufa, y Le cantatrice, con libreto de Carlo Goldoni. Durante este periodo entabló relación con Johann Christian Bach, organista de la Catedral de Milán, y con el padre Giovanni Battista Martini. Después de presentar en Milán varias óperas bufas, en 1769 finalizó su carrera operística en Turín con la ópera L’illustre villanella, pues a partir de entonces sólo compondría música instrumental. En 1770 colaboró con los cantantes en los ensayos de la ópera Mitridate, re di Ponto de Mozart, y el 3 de agosto de 1778 participó como clavecinista en el estreno de la ópera de Antonio Salieri L'Europa riconosciuta, con motivo de la inauguración del Teatro alla Scala de Milán.

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Semiramide riconosciuta, opera seria (1741). Duo: Crudel morir mi vedi. Aria: Tu mi disprezzi.

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Otakar Ostrčil (1879-1935) Ostrčil was born, and spent his entire life, in Prague, the center of the Czech musical community of his generation. He studied philosophy at Charles University, attending the classes of Otakar Hostinský, and simultaneously studied composition and music theory privately under Zdeněk Fibich. From his early student days he was a close friend of Zdeněk Nejedlý, whose outspoken voice in musicology formed Ostrčil's greatest critical support. He worked as a conductor at the Vinohrady Theater (1914-1919) and later at the National Theatre (Prague) (1920-1935), which was one of the most influential positions in Czech musical life. He also worked as a pedagogue at the Prague Conservatory, teaching conducting.

Ostrčil wrote six operas: Jan Zhořelecký (written as a student under Fibich, 1898, unperformed), Vlasty skon (Vlasta's passing, premiered 1904, to a libretto previously considered by Smetana and Fibich), Kunálovy oči (Kunál's eyes, 1908), Poupě (The Bud, 1912), Legenda z Erinu (A Legend of Erin, 1921), and Honzovo království (Johnny's Kingdom, based on a short story by Leo Tolstoy, 1934). His most significant orchestral music includes Symphony in A (1906), Impromptu (1912), Suite in c minor (1914), Symfonietta (1922), Léto (Summer, tone poem, 1927), and Křížova cesta (The Way of the Cross, orchestral variations, 1929). He also composed various works for chamber and choral ensembles. As was the case with his main musical influence, Gustav Mahler, his rigorous conducting schedule rarely allowed free time for composition, with the exception of the summers when the theater was not in season.

Like his contemporaries, Vítězslav Novák, Josef Suk, and Otakar Zich, Ostrčil composed in a densely orchestrated, thickly contrapuntal style that was heavily influenced by Mahler, Richard Strauss, and the early works of Arnold Schoenberg. At times, the extreme linearity of his work (as in the orchestral preludes to Legenda z Erinu and the climactic sections of Křížova cesta) goes beyond functional harmony; in these moments he can easily be aligned with the Viennese expressionists, whom he much admired. At the very end of his career, with his final opera Honzovo království, he turned to an ironic sort of neoclassicism reminiscent of Paul Hindemith or even Dmitri Shostakovich: the work is full of grotesque marches and folk dances that match the socialist politics of the libretto's mock folktale atmosphere.

As a conductor, Ostrčil had a significant influence on his younger contemporaries in the interwar period. From the beginning of his time at the National Theater he conceived new ideas of musical leadership and choice of repertoire, wherein representatives of the current generation of musical modernism, both at home and abroad, were presented to Prague audiences as a matter of cultural responsibility. As a result, under Ostrčil, Prague saw the Czech premieres of works by Debussy, Strauss, Stravinsky, Darius Milhaud, Zich, and most importantly, the opera Wozzeck by Alban Berg in 1926.

These programming choices met extreme controversy over Ostrčil's fifteen-year administration at the National Theater, especially from conservative critics such as Antonín Šilhan, who branded the conductor an anti-Czech pro-communist traitor, and whose articles prompted a riot at the third performance of Wozzeck. Many of these criticisms had to do with Ostrčil's close association with Nejedlý, who by this time was a strong proponent of the Czechoslovak Communist Party. It was Ostrčil's belief in the necessity of presenting modern art to the public that won him many supporters among the students of Prague, led by the young pedagogue and microtonal composer Alois Hába; in a climate increasingly unsympathetic to modernist exploration, the conductor was hailed as a hero. His untimely death in 1935, at the height of his career, was a bitter blow to the community, and for the remainder of the democratic era (to 1938) his achievements were continually rhapsodized in print.

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Honzovo království, cuento de hadas en tres actos (1933). Fragmento.

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Peter Erasmus Lange-Müller (1850-1926) He was born in Frederiksberg, Denmark. Lange-Müller came from a wealthy and musical family of scientists, clergymen and academics and was taught the piano from an early age by Gottfred Matthison-Hansen. After leaving school in 1870 he enrolled at Copenhagen University (to read political science) and at the conservatory, where he was taught the piano by Edmund Neupert, but ill-health soon forced him to give up his studies. Throughout his life he suffered from constant headaches, which affected both his personal relations and his musical development. He was largely self-taught, and his isolation meant that he could more readily develop the original and untraditional characteristics of his music; he withdrew from official musical life except between 1879 and 1883, when he was conductor of the Koncertforening that he had helped to found. Shortly after his marriage in 1892 he moved to a beautiful country estate in northern Zealand, and the surroundings there deeply influenced his creative work. Lange-Müller was a Romantic by temperament and artistic inclination. His style was strongly influenced by the music of his countrymen Hartmann and Heise and by that of Schumann, but he evolved an individual late Romantic style built around emotionally concentrated tonal effects on a dark harmonic background, reminiscent of Brahms and contemporary French developments – an expression of nostalgia that was not directly followed up in Danish music. His substantial output is dominated by vocal music.

The Piano Trio op.53 is one of his best instrumental pieces, b)ut his lack of technical training becomes apparent in the sometimes awkward orchestration of his larger works. As a composer of songs he had no equal among his Danish contemporaries; his wide choice of texts and acute sensitivity to the mood of each poem enabled him to create a vocal style whose subtlety was without precedent in Danish music. He found a source of sympathetic inspiration in his friend, the poet Thor Lange, whose varied imagery and reworkings of Russian and other Slav folk poetry influenced Lange-Müller's musical expression. He hoped for success as a composer of opera, as is shown by his numerous efforts in that genre, but his most ambitious work, the opera Vikingeblod, was also his greatest disappointment; the critics found the style and subject outdated, and this judgment may partly account for the decline in his output after 1900 and its virtual cessation by 1910. By that time, however, his songs with piano and works such as the Madonnasange op.65 and the music for Der var engang (‘Once upon a time’) op.25 had secured the widespread acceptance and popularity of his music. The younger generation of Danish composers regarded him with respect and veneration.

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Vikingeblod, ópera en cuatro actos (1900). Fragmento.

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