Fecha actual 16 Ago 2018 8:54

Todos los horarios son UTC + 1 hora [ DST ]




Nuevo tema Responder al tema  [ 1083 mensajes ]  Ir a página Anterior  1 ... 69, 70, 71, 72, 73
Autor Mensaje
 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 27 Jul 2018 20:27 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2582
Imagen

Veli-Matti Puumala (*1965) He was born in Kaustinen, Finland. He studied composition at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki with Heininen (1984–1993) and completed his master’s degree in 1993. He attended Donatoni’s summer course at the Accademia Musicale Chigiana in Siena (1989–1990); he has also taken part in composition courses directed by Klaus Huber, Gérard Grisey and Magnus Lindberg. Puumala, who since the beginning of the 1990s has been the most conspicuous composer of his generation in the Nordic lands, has written almost entirely instrumental music. His work has strong stylistic links with that of his teacher Heininen: a post-serial, rigorously modernist texture centres on an abundance of detail and its precise formulation. Tone colours and the use of a variety of musical techniques are the main points of interest. The most distinctive trait of his earliest works, which are short, is their compact mode of expression which, together with the abundant detail, is particularly noticeable in the trilogy for chamber ensemble Scroscio (1989), Verso (1991) and Ghirlande (1992). In Ghirlande especially, alternation of soft and harsh sounds is a significant feature.

The String Quartet (1994) marks a clear turning-point in Puumala’s music: motifs are given more space and time than before, and from this work onwards thematic treatment is broader and more elaborate. He then became particularly interested in the transformation of motifs into series, as in Chant Chains (1995) and Chains of Camenae (1996) for chamber orchestra. Strict modernism has given way to a more freely advancing expression, particularly in Soira (1996) for chamber ensemble, into which he brings some of the structural features of traditional music from his native Kaustinen and also introduces novel acoustic solutions by including four groups of unspecified instruments, among them bottles that are blown into. He goes on to seek a totally new orchestral sound in his most extensive orchestral piece Chainsprings (1997), by, for example, seating the orchestra in quite a different way.

Grove

Anna Liisa, ópera en tes actos (2001–2008). Escena segunda del acto segundo.

Imagen

_________________
Imagen


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 03 Ago 2018 23:03 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2582
Imagen

Lori Laitman (*1955) Described by Fanfare Magazine as “one of the most talented and intriguing of living composers,” Lori Laitman has composed multiple operas and choral works, and over 250 songs, setting texts by classical and contemporary poets (including those who perished in the Holocaust). Her music is widely performed, internationally and throughout the United States (Carnegie Hall, Benaroya Recital Hall, Strathmore Hall, Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, The Kennedy Center, The Concertgebouw and Wigmore Hall among others) and has generated substantial critical acclaim. The Journal of Singing wrote “It is difficult to think of anyone before the public today who equals her exceptional gifts for embracing a poetic text and giving it new and deeper life through music.”

The Scarlet Letter, ópera en dos actos (2008, rev. 2015-2016). Del acto primero: The Prison.

Imagen

_________________
Imagen


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 10 Ago 2018 21:01 
Desconectado
Div@
Div@
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 05 Oct 2005 20:42
Mensajes: 2582
Imagen

Jacques-François-Fromental-Élie Halévy (1799-1862). Halévy was born in Paris, son of the cantor Élie Halfon Halévy, who was the secretary of the Jewish community of Paris and a writer and teacher of Hebrew, and a French Jewish mother. The name Fromental (meaning 'oat grass'), by which he was generally known, reflects his birth on the day dedicated to that plant: 7 Prairial in the French Revolutionary calendar, which was still operative at that time. He entered the Conservatoire de Paris at the age of nine or ten (accounts differ), in 1809, becoming a pupil and later protégé of Cherubini. After two second-place attempts, he won the Prix de Rome in 1819: his cantata subject was Herminie. As he had to delay his departure to Rome because of the death of his mother, he was able to accept the first commission that brought him to public attention: a Marche Funèbre et De Profundis en Hébreu for three part choir, tenor and orchestra, which was commissioned by the Consistoire Israélite du Département de la Seine, for a public service in memory of the assassinated duc de Berry, performed on 24 March 1820. Later, his brother Léon recalled that the De Profundis, "infused with religious fervor, created a sensation, and attracted interest to the young laureate of the institute". Halévy was chorus master at the Théâtre Italien, while he struggled to get an opera performed. Despite the mediocre reception of L'artisan, at the Opéra-Comique in 1827, Halévy moved on to be chorus master at the Opéra. The same year he became professor of harmony and accompaniment at the Conservatoire de Paris, where he was professor of counterpoint and fugue in 1833 and of composition in 1840.

With his opera La Juive, in 1835, Halévy attained not only his first major triumph, but gave the world a work that was to be one of the cornerstones of the French repertory for a century, with the role of Eléazar one of the great favorites of tenors such as Enrico Caruso. The opera's most famous aria is Eléazar's "Rachel, quand du Seigneur". Its orchestral ritornello is the one quotation from Halévy that Berlioz included in his Treatise on Instrumentation, for its unusual duet for two cors anglais. It is probable, however, that this aria was inserted only at the request of the great tenor Adolphe Nourrit, who premiered the role and may have suggested the aria's text. La Juive is one of the grandest of grand operas, with major choruses, a spectacular procession in Act I and impressive celebrations in Act III. It culminates with the heroine plunging into a vat of boiling water in Act V. Mahler admired it greatly, stating: "I am absolutely overwhelmed by this wonderful, majestic work. I regard it as one of the greatest operas ever created". Other admirers included Wagner, who wrote an enthusiastic review of Halévy's grand operas for the German press in 1841 (Wagner never showed towards Halévy the anti-Jewish animus that was so notorious a feature of his writings on Meyerbeer and Mendelssohn).

Halévy was elected to the Institut de France in 1836, but after La Juive, his real successes were relatively few, although at least three operas, L'Éclair, La Reine de Chypre and Charles VI received some critical and popular acclaim. Heine commented that Halévy was an artist, but "without the slightest spark of genius". He became, however, a leading bureaucrat of the arts, becoming Secretary of the Académie des Beaux-Arts and presiding over committees to determine the standard pitch of orchestral A, to award prizes for operettas, etc. The artist Eugène Delacroix described Halévy's decline in his diaries (5 February 1855):

I went on to Halévy’s house, where the heat from his stove was suffocating. His wretched wife has crammed his house with bric-a-brac and old furniture, and this new craze will end by driving him to a lunatic asylum. He has changed and looks much older, like a man who is being dragged on against his will. How can he possibly do serious work in this confusion? His new position at the Academy must take up a great deal of his time and make it more and more difficult for him to find the peace and quiet he needs for his work. Left that inferno as quickly as possible. The breath of the streets seemed positively delicious.

Halévy's cantata Prométhée enchaîné was premiered in 1849 at the Paris Conservatoire and is generally considered the first mainstream western orchestral composition to use quarter tones. Halévy died in retirement at Nice in 1862, aged 62, leaving his last opera Noé unfinished. It was completed by his former student Georges Bizet, but was not performed until ten years after Bizet's own death.

Wikipedia

La reine de Chypre, ópera en cinco actos (1841). Final del acto primero.

Imagen

_________________
Imagen


Arriba
 Perfil  
 
Mostrar mensajes previos:  Ordenar por  
Nuevo tema Responder al tema  [ 1083 mensajes ]  Ir a página Anterior  1 ... 69, 70, 71, 72, 73

Todos los horarios son UTC + 1 hora [ DST ]


¿Quién está conectado?

Usuarios navegando por este Foro: Google [Bot], Majestic-12 [Bot] y 4 invitados


No puede abrir nuevos temas en este Foro
No puede responder a temas en este Foro
No puede editar sus mensajes en este Foro
No puede borrar sus mensajes en este Foro

   
     
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Traducción al español por Huan Manwë para phpbb-es.com