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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 02 Dic 2016 20:16 
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Charles François Gounod (1818-1893) He was born in Paris, the son of a pianist mother and an artist father. His mother was his first piano teacher. Under her tutelage, Gounod first showed his musical talents. He entered the Paris Conservatoire, where he studied under Fromental Halévy and Pierre Zimmermann (he later married Anne, Zimmermann's daughter). In 1839, he won the Prix de Rome for his cantata Fernand. He was following his father; François-Louis Gounod (d. 1823) had won the second Prix de Rome in painting in 1783. During his stay of four years in Italy, Gounod studied the music of Palestrina and other sacred works of the sixteenth century; these he never ceased to cherish. Around 1846-1847 he gave serious consideration to joining the priesthood, but he changed his mind before actually taking holy orders, and went back to composition. During that period, he was attached to the Church of Foreign Missions in Paris.

In 1854, Gounod completed a Messe Solennelle, also known as the Saint Cecilia Mass. This work was first performed in its entirety in the church of St. Eustache in Paris on Saint Cecilia's Day, 22 November 1855; from this rendition dates Gounod's fame as a noteworthy composer. During 1855 Gounod wrote two symphonies. His Symphony No. 1 in D major was the inspiration for the Symphony in C, composed later that year by Georges Bizet, who was then Gounod's 17-year-old student. Fanny Mendelssohn, sister of Felix Mendelssohn, introduced the keyboard music of Johann Sebastian Bach to Gounod, who came to revere Bach. For him, The Well-Tempered Clavier was "the law to pianoforte study...the unquestioned textbook of musical composition". It inspired Gounod to devise a melody and superimpose it on the C major Prelude (BWV 846) from the collection's first book. To this melody, in 1859 (after the deaths of both Mendelssohn siblings), Gounod fitted the words of the Ave Maria, resulting in a setting that became world-famous.

Gounod wrote his first opera, Sapho, in 1851, at the urging of a friend of his, the singer Pauline Viardot; it was a commercial failure. He had no great theatrical success until Faust (1859), derived from Goethe. This remains the composition for which he is best known; and although it took a while to achieve popularity, it became one of the most frequently staged operas of all time, with no fewer than 2,000 performances of the work having occurred by 1975 at the Paris Opéra alone. The romantic and melodious Roméo et Juliette (based on the Shakespeare play Romeo and Juliet), premiered in 1867, is revived now and then but has never come close to matching Faust's popular following. Mireille, first performed in 1864, has been admired by connoisseurs rather than by the general public. The other Gounod operas have fallen into oblivion.

From 1870 to 1874 Gounod lived in England, at 17 Morden Road, Blackheath. A blue plaque has been put up on the house to show where he lived. He became the first conductor of what is now the Royal Choral Society. Much of his music from this time is vocal, although he also composed the Funeral March of a Marionette in 1872. He became entangled with the amateur English singer Georgina Weldon, a relationship (platonic, it seems) which ended in great acrimony and embittered litigation. Gounod had lodged with Weldon and her husband in London's Tavistock House. He performed publicly many times with Ferdinando de Cristofaro, a mandolin virtuoso living in Paris. Gounod was said to take pleasure in accompanying Cristofaro's mandolin compositions with piano.

Later in his life, Gounod returned to his early religious impulses, writing much sacred music. His Pontifical Anthem (Marche Pontificale, 1869) eventually (1949) became the official national anthem of Vatican City. He expressed a desire to compose his Messe à la mémoire de Jeanne d'Arc (1887) while kneeling on the stone on which Joan of Arc knelt at the coronation of Charles VII of France. A devout Catholic, he had on his piano a music-rack in which was carved an image of the face of Jesus. He was made a Grand Officer of the Légion d'honneur in July 1888. In 1893, shortly after he had put the finishing touches to a Requiem written for his grandson, he died of a stroke in Saint-Cloud, France.

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Sapho, ópera en tres actos (1851, rev. 1884). Fragmento.

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La nonne sanglante, ópera en cinco actos (1854). Final.

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Le médecin malgré lui, opéra comique en tres actos (1858). Del acto primero, Non, je te dis.

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Philémon et Baucis, ópera en tres actos (1860, rev. 1876). Fragmento.

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La colombe, opera cómica en dos actos (1860). Fragmento.

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La reine de Saba, grand opéra en cuatro actos (1862). Del acto tercero, Dejà l'aube matinale.

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Mireille, ópera en cinco actos (1864). Fragmento.

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Polyeucte, ópera en cinco actos (1878). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 09 Dic 2016 22:03 
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Mikhail Ivanovich Glinka (Russian: Михаи́л Ива́нович Гли́нка) (1804-1857) He was born in Novospasskoe, a village in Smolensk Province. From the age of 13 he was raised in St. Petersburg. His training was in the upper-class traditions of the capital. He moved in the circles that passed as enlightened for the time, and he experienced the atmosphere of ferment and question that prevailed in Russia with Western exposure, military and social, after 1812. He was said to have been sympathetic toward the Decembrist uprisings of 1825, yet later times found him politically conservative. A prodigy, Glinka studied music with visiting foreigners in St. Petersburg. Of them, John Field should be mentioned as a strong influence, although the close relationship reported between the two is doubtful. He also studied in Italy, and in Berlin at the age of 33 he studied theory and composition with Siegfried Dehn.

Glinka adopted the practice of the numerous Italians dominating music in St. Petersburg: using stories and tunes from Russian historical and folk sources. Thus, his first opera, A Life for the Czar, or Ivan Susanin (1836), told the story of a Russian peasant's sacrifice as he misled Polish troops marching against the Czar. Although willing to accept the occasional folk reference from visiting Italians, many St. Petersburg opera goers found Glinka's effort "music for coachmen." Others, however, approved, and among them was the Czar. With A Life for the Czar, Glinka not only opened Russia's first significant musical chapter but became one of the important figures of European 19th-century romantic nationalism. This coincidence of Russia's first musical efflorescence with the romantic-national phase of Western musical history has left an indelible mark on Russian and Soviet musical thinking to this day.

In his second opera, Ruslan and Ludmilla (1842), Glinka's effort at a "national" style was more marked. The same effort is heard in his numerous songs, a number of which are settings of texts by Aleksandr Pushkin. Glinka ventured also into symphonic music with overtures, the popular Kamarinsky (a fantasy on two Russian folk songs), and music for what has latterly been hailed as the "first Russian symphony" (1834; finished in 1948 by Vissarion Shebalin). His devotion to folk idiom was not limited to the Russian; he treated Middle Eastern, Finnish, Polish, Italian, and Spanish tunes as well. Ruslan and Ludmilla's disappointing reception led Glinka to spend more and more time abroad. Glinka's influence on all subsequent Russian musical development was profound, not just as romantic and nationalist but also as essentially conservative in means. He encouraged Aleksandr Dargomyzhsky and Mily Balakirev on the one hand, Anton Rubinstein and Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky on the other. That he was not as distinctly "Russian" as was fondly held in earlier decades is no slur on his talent, which was great. He died in Berlin, on his way to confer further with Dehn.

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Иван Сусанин ópera en cuatro actos y un epílogo (1834–1837). Fragmento del cuarto acto.

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Руслан и Людмила, ópera en cinco actos (1837–1842). Final del segundo acto.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
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Francesco Gasparini (1661-1727). He was born in Camaiore, nr Lucca. In 1682 he was active as organist at Madonna dei Monti in Rome, where he probably studied with Corelli and Pasquini. He was admitted to the Accademia Filarmonica, Bologna, as a singer on 27 June 1684, and as a composer on 17 May 1685. According to Hawkins, he and his brother Michelangelo Gasparini were living as pupils in Legrenzi’s house in Venice in 1686, but in 1687 Francesco was taking part in accademie in the Roman palace of Cardinal Benedetto Pamphili, both as a violinist and as a composer of arias and cantatas to texts by Pamphili himself. In 1689 he became a member of the Congregazione di S Cecilia and also played in a revival for Pamphili of Lulier’s S Beatrice d’Este. At this time he probably also met Alessandro Scarlatti, and the two were later to demonstrate a mutual respect: Scarlatti sent his son Domenico to Venice in 1705, where he had lessons from Gasparini, and the two exchanged cantatas in 1712. Gasparini’s first known operas were Roderico and Olimpia vendicata, both produced in 1686 at Livorno. In 1695 he published a set of cantatas. He must by this time have achieved some reputation, as on 5 June 1701 he was appointed to the important post of maestro di coro at the Ospedale della Pietà, Venice, in which city he met Vivaldi, Legrenzi, Pollarolo and Lotti. Gasparini was very successful in this post, which involved directing all the conservatory’s musical activities. He expanded the staff (he engaged Vivaldi as violin master) and by 1707 the conservatory ranked as one of the best in Italy. With the move to Venice, Gasparini’s career as an opera composer also began in earnest; often he wrote three or four new works in a year, most of them first performed in Venice.

On 23 April 1713 Gasparini was given six months’ leave from the Pietà. He never returned but settled again in Rome (operas produced at Florence in Carnival and autumn 1715 may indicate an extended stay there). In July 1716 he succeeded Caldara as maestro di cappella to Prince Ruspoli, for whom he worked until 1718, living in an apartment in the Piazza di S Lorenzo in Lucina. In 1719 he transferred to a house owned by the Borghese family, and he is described in librettos of the period as a virtuoso ‘del principe Borghese’. In 1718 he was admitted to the Arcadian Academy, with the name Ericreo. In 1719 a marriage contract was signed between his daughter and Metastasio (one of whose sonnets is addressed to Gasparini), but for unknown reasons the engagement was soon broken off. Gasparini’s production of new operas continued fairly steadily at Rome and other cities until 1720. After that only a few new ones appeared, the last in 1724. In February 1725 he was named maestro di cappella at S Giovanni in Laterano, but he did not take up the post until June 1786; his assistant was Girolamo Chiti.

Gasparini at his best was a composer of the first rank. Burney’s description of his cantatas – which are some of the most important of his time – as ‘graceful, elegant, natural, and often pathetic’ can be extended to much of his other music. These qualities rested on a profound technical skill, most obvious in the easy and frequent use of complicated canonic devices in his church music but also apparent from the mastery of free counterpoint in his other works (such as the set of brilliantly written chamber duets, in GB-Lbl). The arias in Gasparini’s earlier operas are typical of the period in using a variety of formal types, but mostly within a da capo format; some arias in the later operas, however, show homophonic textures and melodic and rhythmic traits that make them forerunners of the work of the next generation. His recitatives were praised by Padre Martini; Haas saw him as a model for Handel in his dramatic treatment of accompanied ones. His sacred music includes works both in the strict style and in the modern concerted style with independent instrumental parts. Some of the solo sacred motets are virtually indistinguishable from his secular ones in form (except for the concluding alleluia) and expressive character; but that was typical of the time.

Gasparini was highly regarded as a teacher. Besides Domenico Scarlatti his pupils included Quantz, Platti and Benedetto Marcello, who sent him his Estro poetico-armonico for his criticism. L’armonico pratico is a practical manual of figured bass accompaniment for beginners with some musical knowledge. It was used throughout the 18th century, going into numerous editions, the last in 1802, and remains an important source of information about continuo realization at that time. Other theoretical essays by him survive in manuscript. Because of confusion with Gasparo Visconti, called ‘Gasparini’, it was long thought that Francesco Gasparini had visited London in the first decade of the 18th century; two of his operas were performed there in 1711 and 1712. Chamber music published by Quirino Gasparini in the middle of the century has also been wrongly attributed to him.

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Il Bajazet, dramma in musica (1719). Aria del acto segundo, Questa sola e il mio tesoro. Trio del acto segundo, Voglio strage.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
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Gordon Peter Getty (*1933) Getty was raised in San Francisco, California, attended St. Ignatius College Preparatory, University of San Francisco and earned a B.A. in music from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. He joined the oil business to please his father; however, he eventually sold the family's Getty Oil to Texaco in 1986 for US$10 billion. In 1983, Forbes magazine ranked him the richest person in America with a net worth a little over $2 billion. His current net worth is cited as $2 billion, making him the 212th richest person in the United States. Getty is one of the nation's leading venture capitalists and philanthropists. In 2002, he donated US$3 million to the Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation, a charitable trust. He is a major fundraiser for local and national Democratic Party candidates, and has contributed to the campaigns of Nancy Pelosi, Willie Brown, Gavin Newsom, and John Kerry.

Among a number of professions, Getty is a classical music composer, whose compositions include the opera Plump Jack, Joan and the Bells, piano pieces and a collection of choral works. Aspiring to become an opera singer, Getty studied in the mid-1970s with Louise Caselotti, a mezzo soprano who had been Maria Callas' voice teacher (1946–1947). He and his wife have supported the fine arts, especially underwriting productions of the San Francisco Opera and the Russian National Orchestra. In 2002, Getty founded ReFlow, a company which temporarily purchases shares in mutual funds to save funds taxes and commissions. On May 9, 2015, there was a debut performance at Leipzig Opera of the The Canterville Ghost opera by Gordon Getty.

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Usher House, ópera en un acto (2013). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 25 Dic 2016 22:31 
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Dado los problemas que de momento tiene goear, para esta viñeta he cambiado de servidor. De seguir así es imposible actualizar los enlaces caidos en el nuevo servidor ya que sería una tarea enorme.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 18 Ene 2017 20:04 
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¿El hilo ha fallecido o son vacaciones prolongadas? Yo soy de los que esperaba el viernes para leer su aportación. En cualquier caso, mil gracias por todo.


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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 18 Ene 2017 20:08 
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Mas bien obligadas. Primero fue encontrar otro servidor y después una gripa que no me deja. Espero retomar esta semana.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 21 Ene 2017 19:43 
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Ubicación: ¿Invadiendo Polonia?
Creo que no soy tan fiel como MarttiT, pero también sigo el hilo con interés, así que espero una pronta victoria sobre todos los virus (los biológicos y los informáticos).

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Para saber mucho: vivir muchos años, caminar muchas tierras, leer buenos libros o conversar con amigos sabios y discretos. (Baltasar Gracián)


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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
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Paul Felix Weingartner, Edler von Münzberg (1863-1942) Weingartner was born in Zara, Dalmatia, Austria–Hungary (now Zadar, Croatia), to Austrian parents. The family moved to Graz in 1868, and his father died later that year. He studied with Wilhelm Mayer (who published his own compositions under the pseudonym of W. A. Rémy and also taught Ferruccio Busoni). In 1881 he went to Leipzig to study philosophy, but soon devoted himself entirely to music, entering the Conservatory in 1883 and studying in Weimar as one of Franz Liszt's last pupils. Liszt helped produce the world premiere of Weingartner's opera Sakuntala in 1884 with the Weimar orchestra. According to Liszt biographer Alan Walker, however, the Weimar orchestra of the 1880s was far from its peak of a few decades earlier and the performance ended up poorly, with the orchestra going one way and the chorus another. Walker got this account from Weingartner's autobiography, published in Zürich and Leipzig in 1928-1929. The same year, 1884, he assumed the directorship of the Königsberg Opera. From 1885 to 1887 he was Kapellmeister in Danzig, then in Hamburg until 1889, and in Mannheim until 1891. Starting that year, he was Kapellmeister of the Royal Opera and conductor of symphony concerts in Berlin. He eventually resigned from the opera post while continuing to conduct the symphony concerts, and then settled in Munich, where he incurred the enmity of pundits like Rudolf Louis and Ludwig Thuille.

In 1902, at the Mainz Festival, Weingartner conducted all nine Beethoven symphonies. From 1907 to 1910 he was the Director of the Vienna Hofoper, succeeding Gustav Mahler; he retained the conductorship of the Vienna Philharmonic until 1927. From 1912 he was again Kapellmeister in Hamburg, but resigned in 1914 and went to Darmstadt as general music director while also often conducting in the U.S. for the Boston Opera Company between 1912-1914. In 1919-20, he was chief conductor of the Vienna Volksoper. In 1920, he became a professor at the Franz Liszt Academy in Budapest. From 1927 to 1934 he was music director of the Basel symphony orchestra. He made many outstanding Beethoven and Brahms symphony recordings in Vienna and London between the mid-1920s and his last recording session with the London Symphony, including an electrifying Brahms Second to complete the historic Beethoven-Brahms symphony cycle he began in the 1920s, on February 29, 1940. He gave his last concert in London that year and died in Winterthur, Switzerland two years later.

Weingartner was the first conductor to make commercial recordings of all nine Beethoven symphonies, and the second (to Leopold Stokowski in Philadelphia) to record all four Brahms symphonies. In 1935 he conducted the world premiere of Georges Bizet's long-lost Symphony in C. His crisp classical conducting style contrasted with the romantic approach of many of his contemporaries such as Wilhelm Furtwängler, whose conducting is now considered "subjective" on the basis of tempo fluctuations not called for in the printed scores; while Weingartner was more like Arturo Toscanini in insisting on playing as written. His 1935 recording of Beethoven's Symphony No. 9, for instance, sounds much more like Toscanini's 1936, 1938, 1939 and 1952 renditions (only the last of which was recorded in a studio rather than at a concert) than Furtwängler's far more expansive readings. He taught conducting to students as eminent as Paul Sacher, Charles Houdret, Georg Tintner and Josef Krips. He experimented with films of himself conducting (such as in his only recorded performance of Weber's overture to Der Freischütz) as a tool in "orchestral training". He was married five times, to Marie Juillerat (in 1891), Baroness Feodora von Dreifus (1903), mezzo-soprano Lucille Marcel (1912; died in 1921), actress Roxo Betty Kalisch (1922), and Carmen Studer (1931).

Despite his lifelong career as a conductor, Weingartner regarded himself as equally, if not more importantly, a composer. His musical style, notably very generous, indeed rather valuable in its rather Schubertian melodic interest, is of its time: an amalgam of late Romanticism and early Modernism, comparable with those of his contemporaries Richard Strauss, Gustav Mahler, Franz Schreker and Alexander Zemlinsky. His idiom left some marks on Erich Wolfgang Korngold, whose precocious Sinfonietta is dedicated to Weingartner, who conducted its first performance. His Third Symphony was intended both as a message of love to Lucille Marcel and a reply to the many critical attacks on him in Vienna; the finale reaches a climax in a parody of the waltz from Johann Strauss II's Die Fledermaus. Similarly, he managed to finish his Fifth Symphony in time for Roxo Betty's birthday, a trend in romantic attachment which may attract at least passing notice, for he was thus a very dedicated bridegroom in his deployment of manuscript paper.

Weingartner edited, with Charles Malherbe, the complete works of Hector Berlioz (he once called Berlioz the "creator of the modern orchestra") as well as the operas Joseph by Méhul and Oberon by Weber, and individual works of Gluck, Wagner and others. He also made orchestral versions of piano works such as Beethoven's Hammerklavier Sonata, Weber's Invitation to the Dance, and Bizet's Variations chromatiques. Before Brian Newbould's more recent work, in 1934, he made a performing version of Schubert's Symphony No. 7 in E major, D. 729, that has received some performances and recordings; he also arranged works by a number of early Romantic masters for orchestral performance.

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Die Dorfschule, ópera en un acto (1920). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
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Bienvenido una vez más a esta que es nuestra casa, la de los curiosos. Gracias.


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Y a ver si tenemos suerte con el vocaroo...


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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
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Giuseppe Nicolini (1762-1842) He was born in Piacenza. The sixth of 14 brothers, he first studied music with his father, Omobono Nicolini, organist and maestro di cappella in Piacenza, and singing with Filippo Macedone. With financial help from Duke Gian Girolamo Sforza Fogliani of Piacenza he studied composition for seven years, probably from 1778 to 1784, at the Conservatorio di S Onofrio in Naples, where his teachers were Insanguine and later Cimarosa. After composing the oratorio Daniele nel lago dei leoni (1781, Naples) and the azione sacra Giuditta (1785, Venice), he made his opera début with La famiglia stravagante (1793, Parma). This first success was followed by at least 45 works, produced at the rapid pace imposed by the market.

As one of the last representatives of the old Neapolitan school, which by 1800 was in decline and was soon to be engulfed in a process of national unification of musical taste (to which the work of Rossini was to give the strongest impetus), Nicolini imitated its models with ability but reduced them to stereotyped formulae. Nevertheless, for about 20 years, principally between 1811 and 1820, he could count on an enormous public, even outside Italy, who exalted him to the level of the most celebrated masters. In 1807 in Rome, his Traiano in Dacia, starring the castrato Velluti, defeated Cimarosa’s much-loved classic Gli Orazi ed i Curiazi in a contest for popular favour. His operas were performed by the best virtuosos of the time, including (besides Velluti) Bonoldi, Pasta, Pisaroni and the young Catalani, who sang in I baccanali di Roma at La Scala in 1801. In 1816, when the administration of the Teatro Nuovo (thereafter the Teatro Comunale) passed from the Duchess Maria Luisa to the municipality of Piacenza, he was appointed for life to the service of that theatre by a special decree from the duchess, and from that time he wrote little for the stage. In 1819 he was elected maestro di cappella of the cathedral. In the meantime his fame had become obscured by that of Rossini, although in his final years he assimilated some of the features of Rossini’s style. He abandoned the theatre completely in 1831 to devote himself to sacred music. During his last years, lack of means obliged him to serve in some of the choirs of his city; he died in poverty and forgotten. In 1914 Piacenza named its Liceo Musicale after him.

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L'Amor Mugnaio, o sia I Mulinari, ópera (1794). Aria Ehi … di casa … Molinara.

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Robert Saxton (*1953) Robert Saxton was born in London and started composing at the age of six. He was educated at Bryanston School. Guidance in early years from Benjamin Britten and Elisabeth Lutyens was followed by periods of study at both Cambridge and Oxford Universities with Robin Holloway and Robert Sherlaw Johnson respectively, and also with Luciano Berio. He won the Gaudeamus International Composers Award in the Netherlands at the age of 21. In 1986 he was awarded the Fulbright Arts Fellowship to the USA, where he was in residence at Princeton and was assistant to Oliver Knussen at Tanglewood. In 1995 he co-directed the composers' course on Hoy, with Sir Peter Maxwell Davies. He has directed the composers' course at Dartington International Summer School on several occasions and was artistic director of Opera Lab. He has also been a regular member of the BBC TV 4 (digital) Proms broadcasting commentary team and was a member of the Southbank Centre board for nine years. He is Composer in Association at the Purcell School. Robert Saxton has written works for the BBC (TV, Proms and Radio), LSO, LPO, ECO, London Sinfonietta, Nash Ensemble, Chilingirian String Quartet, Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra (USA), Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival/Opera North, Aldeburgh, Cheltenham, City of London, Three Choirs and Lichfield Festivals, Stephen Darlington and the choir of Christ Church Cathedral Oxford, Susan Milan, Susan Bradshaw and Richard Rodney Bennett, Edward Wickham and The Clerks, Teresa Cahill, Leon Fleisher, Clare Hammond, Steven Isserlis, Mstislav Rostropovich, John Wallace and the Raphael Wallfisch and John York duo. Robert Saxton was Head of Composition at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama (1991–1997) and Head of Composition and Contemporary Music at the Royal Academy of Music from 1998-1999. He is currently Professor of Composition and Tutorial Fellow in Music at Worcester College, Oxford and is a Trustee of the Mendelssohn/Boise Foundation. He was awarded a doctorate of music at Oxford in 1992. His music from 1972 until 1998 was published by Chester/Music Sales, and since then by UYMP and Ricordi. Recordings have appeared on the Sony Classical, Hyperion, Metier, EMI, NMC, Signum and Divine Art labels.

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The Wandering Jew, a radio opera (2010). Fragmento.

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Joseph Weigl (1766-1846) He was born in Eisenstadt where his father, a distinguished cellist, held a position in the court orchestra; young Weigl was the godson of Eisenstadt’s presiding genius, Joseph Haydn. He came to Vienna and studied with Albrechtsberger and with Salieri who took him under his wing. As a répétiteur at the Kärntnertor Theatre he prepared Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro (1786) and Don Giovanni (1788); he probably also rehearsed Così fan tutte. In his autobiography he wrote: ‘To hear a Mozart playing through the most difficult scores with his unique fluency, and at the same time singing and correcting the mistakes of others could not but excite the greatest admiration.’ By his late twenties Weigl became the Kapellmeister at the Kärntnertor and he wrote a number of successful operas. He spent some time in Italy but returned to Vienna in 1808; his greatest successes of the time were Das Waisenhaus of that year, and Die Schweizerfamilie (1809). Both these works were Singspiele, and were known to Schubert from his early years when he had already played numerous Weigl overtures in the school orchestra. In January 1821 Weigl, together with Salieri, signed a testimonial for Schubert regarding his musical abilities (paperwork that helped the composer not a whit). In 1827 Weigl had fallen on harder times (his operas were out of fashion); he and Schubert competed for the same position of vice-Kapellmeister at the Hofkapelle. Weigl won the appointment of course and Schubert apparently approved the choice —he had nothing against Weigl and, after all, he was more than twice the age of the thirty-year-old Schubert. The Viennese publisher Thaddäus Weigl, Joseph Weigl’s brother, later issued a number of Schubert songs under his own imprint.

Hyperion

Die Schweizerfamilie, ópera lírica en tres actos (1809). Final.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
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Liza Lim (*1966) Lim was born in Perth, Western Australia. At the age of 11, she was encouraged by her teachers at Presbyterian Ladies' College, Melbourne to turn from piano and violin to composition. She has said that she "owes everything to them". Lim earned her Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Queensland, her Master of Music from the University of Melbourne (1996), and her Bachelor of Arts from the Victorian College of the Arts (1986). She has studied composition in Melbourne with Richard David Hames, Riccardo Formosa, and in Amsterdam with Ton de Leeuw. She has been a guest lecturer at the Darmstadt Summer School, the University of California, San Diego, Cornell University, Getty Research Institute, major Australian universities and at the IRCAM Agora Festival. She was a lecturer of composition at Melbourne University in 1991. Lim was the guest curator for the twilight concert series of the 2006 Adelaide Festival of Arts.

Lim has been commissioned by some of the most eminent performers in the world including the Los Angeles Philharmonic (for whom she wrote Ecstatic Architecture for the inaugural season of the Frank Gehry-designed Walt Disney Concert Hall), Ensemble InterContemporain, Ensemble Modern, BBC Symphony Orchestra, Arditti String Quartet and the Cikada Ensemble. Her work has featured at festivals such as Festival d'automne à Paris, MaerzMusik at the Berliner Festspiele, Venice Biennale, Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival and all the major Australian festivals.

Since 1986, Lim has worked extensively with members of the ELISION Ensemble; she is married to Daryl Buckley, its artistic director. In 2005, Lim was appointed the composer-in-residence with the Sydney Symphony Orchestra for two years. Among other works, the orchestra commissioned—jointly with the radio station Bayerischer Rundfunk—her work The Compass; in its premiere performance on 23 August 2006 at the Sydney Opera House it was conducted by Alexander Briger, William Barton played the didgeridoo. Sponsored by the German Academic Exchange Service, she spent one year in 2007/2008 as artist-in-residence in Berlin where she developed her third opera, The Navigator, inspired by Tristan and Isolde to a libretto by Patricia Sykes. She was appointed professor in composition at the University of Huddersfield in March 2008.

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The Oresteia, ópera en siete partes (1991–1993). Final.

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