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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 27 Jul 2018 20:27 
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Veli-Matti Puumala (*1965) He was born in Kaustinen, Finland. He studied composition at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki with Heininen (1984–1993) and completed his master’s degree in 1993. He attended Donatoni’s summer course at the Accademia Musicale Chigiana in Siena (1989–1990); he has also taken part in composition courses directed by Klaus Huber, Gérard Grisey and Magnus Lindberg. Puumala, who since the beginning of the 1990s has been the most conspicuous composer of his generation in the Nordic lands, has written almost entirely instrumental music. His work has strong stylistic links with that of his teacher Heininen: a post-serial, rigorously modernist texture centres on an abundance of detail and its precise formulation. Tone colours and the use of a variety of musical techniques are the main points of interest. The most distinctive trait of his earliest works, which are short, is their compact mode of expression which, together with the abundant detail, is particularly noticeable in the trilogy for chamber ensemble Scroscio (1989), Verso (1991) and Ghirlande (1992). In Ghirlande especially, alternation of soft and harsh sounds is a significant feature.

The String Quartet (1994) marks a clear turning-point in Puumala’s music: motifs are given more space and time than before, and from this work onwards thematic treatment is broader and more elaborate. He then became particularly interested in the transformation of motifs into series, as in Chant Chains (1995) and Chains of Camenae (1996) for chamber orchestra. Strict modernism has given way to a more freely advancing expression, particularly in Soira (1996) for chamber ensemble, into which he brings some of the structural features of traditional music from his native Kaustinen and also introduces novel acoustic solutions by including four groups of unspecified instruments, among them bottles that are blown into. He goes on to seek a totally new orchestral sound in his most extensive orchestral piece Chainsprings (1997), by, for example, seating the orchestra in quite a different way.

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Anna Liisa, ópera en tes actos (2001–2008). Escena segunda del acto segundo.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 03 Ago 2018 23:03 
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Lori Laitman (*1955) Described by Fanfare Magazine as “one of the most talented and intriguing of living composers,” Lori Laitman has composed multiple operas and choral works, and over 250 songs, setting texts by classical and contemporary poets (including those who perished in the Holocaust). Her music is widely performed, internationally and throughout the United States (Carnegie Hall, Benaroya Recital Hall, Strathmore Hall, Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, The Kennedy Center, The Concertgebouw and Wigmore Hall among others) and has generated substantial critical acclaim. The Journal of Singing wrote “It is difficult to think of anyone before the public today who equals her exceptional gifts for embracing a poetic text and giving it new and deeper life through music.”

The Scarlet Letter, ópera en dos actos (2008, rev. 2015-2016). Del acto primero: The Prison.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 10 Ago 2018 21:01 
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Jacques-François-Fromental-Élie Halévy (1799-1862). Halévy was born in Paris, son of the cantor Élie Halfon Halévy, who was the secretary of the Jewish community of Paris and a writer and teacher of Hebrew, and a French Jewish mother. The name Fromental (meaning 'oat grass'), by which he was generally known, reflects his birth on the day dedicated to that plant: 7 Prairial in the French Revolutionary calendar, which was still operative at that time. He entered the Conservatoire de Paris at the age of nine or ten (accounts differ), in 1809, becoming a pupil and later protégé of Cherubini. After two second-place attempts, he won the Prix de Rome in 1819: his cantata subject was Herminie. As he had to delay his departure to Rome because of the death of his mother, he was able to accept the first commission that brought him to public attention: a Marche Funèbre et De Profundis en Hébreu for three part choir, tenor and orchestra, which was commissioned by the Consistoire Israélite du Département de la Seine, for a public service in memory of the assassinated duc de Berry, performed on 24 March 1820. Later, his brother Léon recalled that the De Profundis, "infused with religious fervor, created a sensation, and attracted interest to the young laureate of the institute". Halévy was chorus master at the Théâtre Italien, while he struggled to get an opera performed. Despite the mediocre reception of L'artisan, at the Opéra-Comique in 1827, Halévy moved on to be chorus master at the Opéra. The same year he became professor of harmony and accompaniment at the Conservatoire de Paris, where he was professor of counterpoint and fugue in 1833 and of composition in 1840.

With his opera La Juive, in 1835, Halévy attained not only his first major triumph, but gave the world a work that was to be one of the cornerstones of the French repertory for a century, with the role of Eléazar one of the great favorites of tenors such as Enrico Caruso. The opera's most famous aria is Eléazar's "Rachel, quand du Seigneur". Its orchestral ritornello is the one quotation from Halévy that Berlioz included in his Treatise on Instrumentation, for its unusual duet for two cors anglais. It is probable, however, that this aria was inserted only at the request of the great tenor Adolphe Nourrit, who premiered the role and may have suggested the aria's text. La Juive is one of the grandest of grand operas, with major choruses, a spectacular procession in Act I and impressive celebrations in Act III. It culminates with the heroine plunging into a vat of boiling water in Act V. Mahler admired it greatly, stating: "I am absolutely overwhelmed by this wonderful, majestic work. I regard it as one of the greatest operas ever created". Other admirers included Wagner, who wrote an enthusiastic review of Halévy's grand operas for the German press in 1841 (Wagner never showed towards Halévy the anti-Jewish animus that was so notorious a feature of his writings on Meyerbeer and Mendelssohn).

Halévy was elected to the Institut de France in 1836, but after La Juive, his real successes were relatively few, although at least three operas, L'Éclair, La Reine de Chypre and Charles VI received some critical and popular acclaim. Heine commented that Halévy was an artist, but "without the slightest spark of genius". He became, however, a leading bureaucrat of the arts, becoming Secretary of the Académie des Beaux-Arts and presiding over committees to determine the standard pitch of orchestral A, to award prizes for operettas, etc. The artist Eugène Delacroix described Halévy's decline in his diaries (5 February 1855):

I went on to Halévy’s house, where the heat from his stove was suffocating. His wretched wife has crammed his house with bric-a-brac and old furniture, and this new craze will end by driving him to a lunatic asylum. He has changed and looks much older, like a man who is being dragged on against his will. How can he possibly do serious work in this confusion? His new position at the Academy must take up a great deal of his time and make it more and more difficult for him to find the peace and quiet he needs for his work. Left that inferno as quickly as possible. The breath of the streets seemed positively delicious.

Halévy's cantata Prométhée enchaîné was premiered in 1849 at the Paris Conservatoire and is generally considered the first mainstream western orchestral composition to use quarter tones. Halévy died in retirement at Nice in 1862, aged 62, leaving his last opera Noé unfinished. It was completed by his former student Georges Bizet, but was not performed until ten years after Bizet's own death.

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La reine de Chypre, ópera en cinco actos (1841). Final del acto primero.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 17 Ago 2018 20:44 
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Behzad Abdi (*1973) He was born in Tehran, Iran, and currently resides in Kiev, Ukraine. At age 15, Behzad Abdi began studying the setar and Persian traditional music with Masoud Shoari and Mohsen Nafar, as well as Western classical music with Liudmila Yurina and Vadim Juravitsky at the Tchaikovsky Academy in Ukraine. Abdi is the first composer to write Iranian traditional opera fusing Iranian traditional and Western classical music. He is also a composer of film soundtracks and has won two awards at the Fajr International Iranian Film Festival, among others.

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Rumi, ópera en dos actos (2009). Comienzo.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 24 Ago 2018 20:25 
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Mason W. Bates (*1977) Bates was raised in Richmond, Virginia, where he studied composition with Dika Newlin and piano with Hope Armstrong Erb at St. Christopher's School. His first symphonic work was commissioned in 1993 by conductor Robert Moody, who conducted Bates’ choral music at Brevard Muisc Center and premiered Free Variations for Orchestra in Evansville, Indiana. Bates subsequently attended Columbia University-Juilliard School program and earned a BA in English literature and MM in music composition, where he studied with John Corigliano, David Del Tredici, and Samuel Adler. In 2001, he relocated to the Bay Area and graduated from the University of California, Berkeley with a PhD in composition in 2008, where he studied with Edmund Campion while working as a DJ in San Francisco clubs and lounges Oakland, California. His work as a DJ led to the founding of Mercury Soul, which performs classical music alongside DJ sets in clubs and in partnership with orchestras. Notable works include Alternative Energy, an energy symphony premiered by Riccardo Muti and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra; Liquid Interface, a water symphony commissioned by the National Symphony Orchestra; and The B-Sides, a symphony commissioned by the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. In 2010 Bates was commissioned to write for the YouTube Symphony Orchestra 2011, an ensemble composed of musicians from around the world. His piece Mothership was performed by the London Symphony Orchestra and went on YouTube a year earlier; it is a mixture of acoustic and electronic elements and features sections for improvisation. In 2014 Bates wrote the film score for Gus Van Sant's 2015 movie The Sea of Trees, starring Matthew McConaughey, Naomi Watts and Ken Watanabe. He made his first foray into the world of opera with the 2017 premiere of The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs, an electro-acoustic piece based on the life of tech visionary Steve Jobs, performed by the Santa Fe Opera.

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The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs, ópera (2017). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 31 Ago 2018 20:23 
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Walter Goehr (1903-1960) Goehr was born in Berlin, where he studied with Arnold Schoenberg and embarked on a conducting career, before being forced as a Jew to seek employment outside Germany after working for Berlin Radio in 1932. He was invited to become music director for the Gramophone Company (later EMI), so he moved to London. In 1937, he conducted the London Philharmonic Orchestra in the premiere recording of Bizet's Symphony in C. During his years as a staff conductor for EMI, he conducted the orchestra for many recordings, including accompaniments for arias sung by Beniamino Gigli, Richard Tauber and Joseph Schmidt. In more popular items, his name appears on the record labels as 'G. Walter' or 'George Walter'. In addition, he conducted for many concerto recordings, including some by Benno Moiseiwitsch, Myra Hess and others. After the war he conducted for several smaller recording companies based in Europe, including for the concerto recordings of short-lived Australian pianist Noel Mewton-Wood.

As well as teaching composition in Britain he also instructed pupils in conducting, one of whom was the young Wally Stott, later known as Angela Morley. In England he worked for the Columbia Record Company, and between 1945 and 1948 was conductor of the BBC Theatre Orchestra (the predecessor of today’s BBC Concert Orchestra); he was also a skilled arranger. He was one of many musicians of European origin and training recruited by Michael Tippett for the staff of Morley College. Goehr conducted many important premieres at Morley, including the first British performance of the Monteverdi Vespers of 1610. His first successful work was Malpopita in 1931, an opera especially designed for radio broadcast. This work was not scheduled for its first live performance until 6 May 2004, in Berlin, Prenzlauer Berg, Abspannwerk Humboldt.

In 1942, he made a new arrangement of Mussorgsky's piano suite Pictures at an Exhibition with a subsidiary piano part. In 1946, he arranged a number of Mussorgsky's piano pieces into the orchestral suite Pictures from the Crimea. In 1947, Goehr composed the music for the much acclaimed film Great Expectations, directed by David Lean. He wrote several other film scores. He was also well known for conducting film soundtracks, including A Canterbury Tale, for which his friend Allan Gray had composed the score. In 1952 he conducted the first recording of L'incoronazione di Poppea, conducting the Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich in a live stage performance. The LP version, issued in 1954, won a Grand Prix du Disque in 1954. He also conducted the UK premiere of Olivier Messiaen's Turangalîla-Symphonie in 1953. He died in City Hall, Sheffield, United Kingdom, on 4 December 1960, immediately after conducting a performance of Handel's Messiah. His son, Alexander Goehr, is a composer living in the United Kingdom.

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Malpopita, radio ópera (1931). Comienzo.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 07 Sep 2018 20:53 
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Paul Méfano (*1937) He was born in Basra, Iraq. Méfano pursued musical studies at the École Normale de Musique de Paris, and then later at the Paris Conservatory (CNSMP), where he was a student of Andrée Vaurabourg-Honegger, Darius Milhaud, and Georges Dandelot. He completed his studies in Basel at the courses taught by Pierre Boulez, Karlheinz Stockhausen, and Henri Pousseur. He regularly attended the concerts of the Domaine Musical, as well as the seminars at Darmstadt, and enrolled in Olivier Messiaen’s class at the CNSMP. Messiaen described Méfano as "restless, intense, and always in search of radical solutions". In 1965 his music was performed publicly for the first time, at the Domaine Musical under the baton of Bruno Maderna. From 1966 to 1968 he lived in the United States, and then in 1969 he moved to Berlin at the invitation of the German Academy of Cultural Exchange (DAAD).

In 1970 he returned to France, signed a contract with Salabert, and devoted himself to composition, to conducting, and to musical life in general. In 1972 he founded the Ensemble 2e2m, a group which he regularly conducts, and with which he has premièred more than five hundred works by young composers and with which he has made more than forty recordings. Amongst those younger composers are Stéphane de Gérando, Laurent Mettraux, Thierry Blondeau, Marc André, Michael Finnissy, James Dillon, Bruce Mather, and Claude Lefèvre, but he has also championed older composers such as Jean Barraqué, Brian Ferneyhough, Franco Donatoni, Luigi Nono, Aldo Clementi, Philippe Boesmans, Morton Feldman, Edison Denisov, and John Cage, as well as participating in the rediscovery of Charles Valentin Alkan and the Czech composers who were interred at Terezienstadt in 1940. He is the founder of the Editions du Mordant for the publication of contemporary music, and of the Editions Musicales Européennes (dedicated primarily to young composers), and he has produced a number of notable radio series (Drake 2001).

In 1972 he was appointed director of the Conservatory of Champigny-sur-Marne, a duty which he performed until 1988. He also was professor of composition and orchestration at the Paris Conservatory until 2002. One of his conducting students was the Canadian composer Claude Vivier. From 1996 until 2005 he directed the Conservatory of Versailles. The most important works of Paul Méfano are published and accessible at BabelScores. In 2007, Paul Méfano became the director of the CLSI ensemble (Circle for the Liberation of Sounds & Images) with various musicians and composers like Gerard Pape, Jacqueline Méfano, Olga Krashenko, Lissa Meridan, Michael Kinney, Martin Phelps, Rodolphe Bourotte, Stefan Tiedje, Jean-Baptiste Favory.

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Micromégas, acción lírica en siete cuadros (1983–1987). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 14 Sep 2018 20:25 
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Arlene Sierra (*1970) She was born in Miami. She studied at Oberlin College Conservatory of Music, Yale University School of Music and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, receiving a DMA in 1999; her principal teachers were Martin Bresnick, Michael Daugherty and Jacob Druckman. A composition fellow at the Britten-Pears School (Aldeburgh Festival) in 2000 and Tanglewood in 2001, teachers included Louis Andriessen, Oliver Knussen, Magnus Lindberg, and Colin Matthews. She also worked with Judith Weir at the Dartington International Summer School in 1999, Paul Heinz Dittrich in Berlin in 1997-1998, and Betsy Jolas and Dominique Troncin at The American Conservatory of Fontainebleau Schools in 1993. Her music has been commissioned by organizations including the Seattle Symphony, Tanglewood Music Festival, the New York Philharmonic, the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival, the Albany Symphony, the Cheltenham International Festival, the Jerome, PRS and Cheswatyr Foundations, and the Ralph Vaughan Williams Trust. Performers of her work have included New York City Opera VOX, the American Composers Orchestra, the London Sinfonietta, the New Music Players, Psappha, the International Contemporary Ensemble, Chroma, the Schubert Ensemble, the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, and the Tokyo Philharmonic. In 2001, she was the first woman to win the Takemitsu Prize; in 2007 she received a Charles Ives Fellowship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters with a citation for music, "by turns, urgent, poetic, evocative and witty." In 2011, a debut CD of chamber music was released by Bridge Records: Arlene Sierra, Volume 1 and she was named Composer of the Year by the Classical Recording Foundation. A second CD, Game of Attrition: Arlene Sierra, Vol. 2, was released in 2014 including four orchestral works recorded by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, Jac Van Steen, conductor. Her work Moler from the same disc was nominated for a Latin Grammy Award in 2014. Sierra was a Composition Tutor at Cambridge University in 2003-2004 before joining Cardiff University School of Music as Lecturer in Composition in 2004. She was promoted to Senior Lecturer in 2010 and to Reader (academic rank) in Composition 2016. Sierra is married to British composer Kenneth Hesketh.

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Dalia, ópera de cámara (2013). Dalia.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 21 Sep 2018 20:53 
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Feliks Nowowiejski (1877-1946) He was born in Wartenburg (today Barczewo) in Warmia in East Prussia, German Empire. His father, Franz Adam Nowowiejski, born in 1830 in Wartenburg, East Prussia, had Polish roots (his grandfather Jan Nowowiejski, born in 1730 in Warmia. married the Pole Anna Jablonska from Tollack). Franz Adam Nowowiejski was a master tailor with his own workshop in Wartenburg, where he also managed a public library of Polish books. Feliks Nowowiejski’s mother, née Katharina Falk, born in 1847, was the second wife of Franz Adam Nowowiejski; she was a German from the neighboring village of Wuttrienen. While Franz Adam Nowowiejski enthusiastically promoted Polish culture, Feliks’s mother displayed a strong interest in the arts, particularly as a pianist. With her participation in performances of Polish folk songs and recitations of noted poets from Poland and Germany as well as her own poetry, she fostered the formidable musical talent of her son, likely an inheritance from her. Despite the patriotic Polish stance of their father, his children spoke better German than they did Polish. As a result, even before his time in Berlin, Feliks Nowowiejski could only write and speak in German.

Nowowiejski’s family had lived in Warmia for several generations. In 1883 Feliks Nowowiejski became a pupil at the elementary school in Wartenburg at the rectory of St. Anne’s Church. Due to his musical talent—he composed his first piano work, a suite of classical and contemporary dances, he entered the convent school in Heiligelinde, where he was taught harmony, violin, cello, French horn, piano, and organ. However, he was unable to complete his studies because of the necessity of providing the sole support for his family. With the bankruptcy of his father’s workshop, the impoverished family resettled in Allenstein in 1893. In 1893 Nowowiejski became a violinist in the orchestra of the Prussian Regiment of Grenadiers, a development that enabled him to support his parents and siblings. He then composed works for military bands and amateur orchestras. Thanks to a composition prize for his march Pod sztandarem pokoju (Under the Banner of Peace), he was able to study at the Stern Conservatory from April to September 1898.

From 1888 to 1900 he assumed the post of organist at St. James’ Church in Allenstein. After being awarded a second prize, he completed a three-month course in counterpoint, Palestrina, and Gregorian chant at the College of Catholic Church Music and Musical Education in Regensburg, Bavaria. He subsequently studied at the Stern Conservatory in Berlin, learning theory and counterpoint under Ludwig Bussler, composition under Wilhelm Taubert, and Gradus ad Parnassum under Heinrich Bellerman, simultaneously perfecting his organ playing under Otto Dienel and playing in the orchestra under the baton of Gustav Hollaender. After submitting a cantata to the Royal Academy of Arts, Berlin, he was accepted into a master class for composition under Max Bruch from 1900 to 1902. At the same time he began studies in musicology and aesthetics at Frederick William University. In Berlin he came into contact with Polish intellectuals and developed a strong Polish patriotism that would often later be reflected in his works, e.g. his Warmian Motifs, Polish Courtship, or Quo Vadis.

For his oratorio Powrót syna marnotrawnego (Return of the Prodigal Son), Nowowiejski won his first Giacomo Meyerbeer Prize. With the 4,500 marks of prize money, he financed an educational tour of Germany, Bohemia, Moravia, Austria, Italy, Africa, France and Belgium, during which he met Gustav Mahler, Camille Saint-Saëns, Pietro Mascagni and Ruggero Leoncavallo. In 1903, he won the Ludwig van Beethoven Prize for his overture Swaty polskie (Polish Courtship). In 1904, for two symphonies, one in A minor (which he later withdrew) and Symphony No. 1 in B-flat Minor, he was awarded his second Giacomo Meyerbeer Prize. With the prize money, Nowowiejski continued his studies under Bruch. He became a composition teacher and choir director at St. Hedwig's Cathedral in Berlin, and later at the Dominican Church of St. Paul. In 1907 he won a composition competition in Lviv (Lemberg/Lwów) with the song Żałobny pochód Kościuszki na Wawel (Funeral Procession of Kościuszko to Wawel); Tadeusz Kościuszko was a Polish general and national hero who also fought in the American Revolution; Wawel is the historic seat of Polish kings.

In 1907, he composed the massive oratorio Quo Vadis, based on the biblical novel by Polish compatriot Henryk Sienkiewicz. After its Amsterdam premiere in 1909, the oratorio was performed in more than 150 cities in Europe, and North and South America, securing Nowowiejski’s international reputation. In 1909 Nowowiejski returned to Poland (then the Duchy of Warsaw), and settled in Krakow, where he served as director of the Krakow Music Society. He was also organist and director of the Warsaw Symphony. On 15 July 1910 - the 500th anniversary of the Battle of Tannenberg - the citizens of Krakow gathered in Jan Matejko Square to sing the Rota by Maria Konopnicka under Nowowiejski’s direction. Rota was a patriotic poem protesting Germanisation that Nowowiejski had set to music. In 1910, with his piece Zagasły już (Extinguished), Nowowiejski took first prize in a Lviv composing competition commemorating the 100th birthday of Frédéric Chopin. In March 1911, Nowowiejski married the Wawel music student Elżbieta Mironow-Mirocka. The couple had five children, a daughter Wanda and four sons: Feliks, Kazimierz, Adam and Jan. In 1914, Nowowiejski won the Lviv Music Prize for his choral work Danae.

Facing increasing hostility in Poland at the outbreak of World War I in 1914, Nowowiejski returned to Berlin. He came under military service, swore an oath to Kaiser Wilhelm, and served as a conductor to a military orchestra. At the end of the war, he returned to the now-Polish city of Poznań. He became a docent at the Ignacy Jan Paderewski Music Academy of Poznań, where he served as composer, conductor, and organist. His appearances as a pro-Polish speaker at the 1920 plebiscite campaigns in Warmia and Masuria (which determined whether these territories would be German or Polish) suggest an increased Polish patriotism. This in turn led to a quarrel with his former teacher Bruch, who successfully called for a German boycott of Nowowiejski’s works. Thereupon Nowowiejski fell into obscurity in Germany as his music was no longer performed. In 1935. Nowowiejski received the title of papal chamberlain from Pope Pius XI for his many religious works. The next year he received the Order of Polonia Restituta (Poland Restored), one of the nation’s highest honours. At the invasion of Poland in 1939, Nowowiejski hid first among the nuns of St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Poznań, afterwards fleeing to Krakow. He had briefly been detained under suspicion of spying for Russia (upon denunciation by a passerby). After World War II, when the People's Republic of Poland gained territories such as Poznań and portions of East Prussia, Nowowiejski was seen increasingly as a Pole due to his pro-Polish views and Polish themes in so many of his works. He subsequently received many honours. After a severe stroke in December 1941, Nowowiejski ended his musical productivity. After a return to Poznań in 1945, he died on 15 January 1946. His memorial grave is located at St. Adalbert’s Church in Poznań.

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Malowanki Ludowe, ópera-ballet (1925). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 28 Sep 2018 20:43 
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Tapio (Juhani) Tuomela (*1958) He was born in Kuusamo, Finland. At the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki he studied the piano with Tapani Valsta (diploma 1982), conducting with Jorma Panula (diploma 1987) and composition with Englund, Hämeenniemi, Heininen and Magnus Lindberg. He completed his piano and conducting studies with Christopher Rouse and Joseph Schwantner at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York, gaining his master’s degree in 1990, and at the West Berlin Hochschule der Künste with Szalonek. He has also attended composition courses directed by Lutosławski, Crumb, Ferneyhough and Klaus Huber. He began his composing career adhering to neo-classical ideals and wrote his Piano Concerto (1981), among other works, for himself to play. In the mid-1980s, in the wake of a stylistic crisis, he developed a more modernist idiom. His music acquired faster-moving textures, rich in both melody and harmony; tone colour played an important role, and he became interested in a sound world of ‘noise’, that is, sounds without definite pitch. Despite the great detail of his works, they have a unity that is broad and clearly defined. He is largely an instrumental composer: among the more important pieces of his modernist phase are the rousingly brisk and virtuoso L’échelle de l‘évasion (‘The Escape Ladder’) for chamber orchestra (1988–1989), Transition for two keyboard players, two percussionists and tape (1989), and a one-movement Symphony (1991, revised 1993). Also central to his output is the experimental chamber opera Korvan tarina (‘The Ear’s Tale’, 1991, rev. 1993), a partially open work in both form and length, which as a ‘meta-opera’ – in the composer’s words – explores opera as both musical genre and sociological phenomenon. Tuomela’s second opera, Äidit ja tyttäret (‘Mothers and Daughters’, 1997–9), based on a subject taken from the Finnish national epic the Kalevala, was commissioned by the Finnish National Opera.

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Äidit ja tyttäret, ópera en tres actos (1997–1999). Final del acto primero.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 05 Oct 2018 21:27 
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Sasha Matson was born in Seattle, and grew up in Berkeley, California. As an undergraduate he attended the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, where his primary composition teachers were Elinor Armer and John Adams – later studying privately with Andrew Imbrie. Sasha completed graduate studies at UCLA, where he received the PhD in music theory and composition. In Los Angeles Sasha composed for a variety of media – his credits include the scores for a dozen dramatic feature films. He has taught at La Grange College, Long Island University, and the State University of New York.

Cooperstown, jazz opera in nine innings (2007). First Inning.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 12 Oct 2018 21:19 
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Georg Caspar Schürmann (1672 (or early 1673)-1751) He was born in Idensen bei Neustadt. According to Walther, he was the son of a pastor, identified as Statius Caspar Schürmann (d 1678), who went to Idensen in 1666. His son began his career at the age of 20 in Hamburg where he found engagements as a male alto both at the opera and in various churches. During the next six years Schürmann performed in an ideal musical milieu for a young musician, especially at the opera where Conradi, Kusser and Keiser were involved with productions of their works, and the music of Steffani (among other outstanding composers) was often heard. In 1697 he travelled with the Hamburg opera company for a series of guest appearances at the Brunswick court of Duke Anton Ulrich of Brunswick-Lüneburg. Soon after, Duke Anton Ulrich appointed Schürmann as solo alto to the court and also, according to Walther, as a conductor for the opera and court church.

Except for two periods of absence, Schürmann remained at the Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel court until his death 54 years later. He quickly established himself as a gifted composer, and in 1700 his first dramatic work, the Italian pastorale Endimione, was performed at the court theatres at Salzthal and Wolfenbüttel. The following year he wrote and produced two sacred operas, Salomon and Daniel. In late 1701 Duke Anton Ulrich sent him to Venice, no doubt to complete his education in the Italian operatic style. Walther said that he made the acquaintance of the most famous composers and musicians while in Venice, and one can speculate that these would have included Antonio and Carlo Francesco Pollarolo, Tommaso Albinoni, Francesco Gasparini and Francesco Pistocchi. Nothing specific is known of Schürmann’s Italian period, and apparently he returned to Germany after only one year to become, on loan from the Duke of Brunswick, Kapellmeister and composer at the court of Meiningen. He remained there until at least 1706 and, in addition to serving as music teacher to the ruling family, he wrote several operas and many church cantatas. In 1706 Schürmann went to produce an opera at Naumburg, where each year an important opera festival was maintained at court during the Petri-Pauli fair (beginning on 29 June and lasting eight days).

Walther stated that Schürmann returned permanently to Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel in 1707. Over more than 30 years his productivity was enormous. After 1739 he is not known to have composed operas, but he remained immersed in court musical life as a conductor, producer of operas, and translator and arranger of the Italian operas which had become the mainstay of the theatre. Schürmann rearranged many of his own works, inserting arias by other composers and creating numerous pasticcios. In his final years he continued to compose for the church as well as occasional pieces for special court festivals. Schürmann, together with Conradi, Kusser, Keiser and Telemann, was an outstanding contributor to the history of German Baroque opera. It is regrettable that of the more than 30 operas he is known to have written only three seem to survive in their entirety and excerpts from another nine remain in manuscript; none of the three complete operas has been published. An outstanding study of Schürmann’s operas was written by G.F. Schmidt, who examined the music in great detail.

Schürmann’s operas demonstrate a successful blending of the operatic style developed in north Germany, especially in Hamburg in the music of Keiser, with the Italian practices he observed in Venice. His operas are aria-orientated, and each aria, in characteristic Baroque fashion, is planned to express a single affection or emotional idealization. Most of the arias have fairly extensive da capo structures, but Schürmann filled these stereotyped forms with richly inventive melodic ideas, strong textural variety (including frequent contrapuntal interplay between the voice and instrumental parts) and colourful solo instrumental writing. The recitatives are in the north German tradition of affective, rhetorical declamation, in which vocal line, harmonic colour (in the continuo part as well as the melody) and dramatic accent add strength and theatrical effectiveness. This is not the recitative of contemporary Italian opera, with its rapid parlando patter, and frequent ‘dry’ punctuations of cadential harmonic formulae in the accompanying harpsichord continuo realization. For Schürmann, as for the Hamburg opera composers, the recitative was still an important component of the musical drama.

Schürmann’s melodic gift, undoubtedly in part the result of his own lengthy career as an operatic singer, makes his works impressively lyrical. The voice parts are never overshadowed by the orchestra, and the instrumental parts generally take on the melodic characteristics of the vocal style – not the reverse procedure, as one finds, for example, in Keiser’s operas. Schürmann continued the Hamburg opera composers’ proclivity for folklike melodies and for arias based on dance rhythms (especially the siciliana, barcarolle and minuet). The dance is in fact a major part of each work, although for the most part other composers (frequently French ones) supplied the music for such ballet insertions. Although Schürmann gave his soloists ample opportunity to excel in written-out coloratura ornamentation, this kind of vocal virtuosity never dominated his arias, as it did for example in much of Keiser’s music.

However, Schürmann’s operas move clearly beyond his Hamburg heritage and in many ways remind one of the later works of Handel. While the textures are frequently contrapuntal, the use of counterpoint occurs as an element of variation, not as a basic compositional procedure. Harmonic rhythm, especially in his last surviving opera, Ludovicus Pius, is markedly slow, at times static, and often similar to that of the early Classical style in Germany. Bass lines, then, are not generally melodic, and indeed often seem to be in the early Classical mould with their tendency to serve a purely harmonic function. Schürmann’s music, in fact, points strongly in the direction of the Classical style and suggests that this composer, who worked with both C.H. Graun and Hasse at Wolfenbüttel, may have played a significant part in the style’s development in Germany during the first half of the 18th century.

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Die getreue Alceste, ópera en tres actos (1719). Aria del acto primero: Zum Waffen!

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
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Aubert Lemeland (1932-2010) Nació en La Haye-du-Puits, Manche. Después de estudios de piano y cello efectuados en Cherbourg, se muda a Paris en 1948, y tras una larga enfermedad produce sus primeros trabajos a mediados de los años sesenta. Ha sido miembro definitivo de la SACEM desde 1987. Ganó el Grand Prix du Disque de la academia Académie Charles-Cros en 1995 y un Diapason d’Or en 1998. Sin ningún apego al movimiento serial, pero admirador de Alban Berg, fue influenciado en sus comienzos por el movimiento neoclásico y la corriente expresionista alemana. Enamorado las grandes formas, Lemeland escribió más de doscientos números de opus: catorce sinfonías compuestas entre 1975 y 2010, quince conciertos, ciclos para voz y orquesta, entre los cuales los más famosos son: Airmen (dedicado a Jules Roy), Time Landscapes, Songs for the dead Soldiers, D’une saison l’autre (escrito para Renée Fleming), dos óperas, la primera, Laura ou Lettre au cachet rouge (basada en Alfred de Vigny), fue representada once veces en Suiza en 1995, la segunda, Lieutenant Karl (basada en Jules Roy), nunca se representó en vida del autor.

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Laure ou la Lettre au cachet rouge, ópera en tres actos (1993-1994). Acto tercero.

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Giuseppe Sarti (1729 (bautizo)-1802) Nació en Faenza. Aunque la fecha de su nacimiento permanece desconocida, se conoce que el 1 de diciem bre de 1729 fue bautizado. Algunas fuentes recientes sitúan la fecha de su nacimiento el 28 de diciembre, pero su bautismo prueba que este dato es erróneo. Completó sus estudios musicales con el padre Giovanni Battista Martini, y fue nombrado organista de la catedral de Faenza antes de los diecinueve años. Renunció a su nombramiento en 1750 para dedicarse al estudio de la música dramática, llegando a ser director del Teatro de Faenza en 1752. Durante mucho tiempo se creyó que Pompeo in Armenia fue su primera obra, pero no existe ninguna prueba escrita que lo atestigüe; su primer trabajo fue sin duda Il re pastore, estrenada en Pesaro en 1752. Sus obras posteriores fueron Medonte, Demofoonte y Olimpiade, con las que se ganó una reputación que provocó que en 1753 el rey Federico V de Dinamarca le invitara a Copenhague como Hofkapellmeister y director de ópera. En este lugar estrenó Ciro riconosciuto. En 1765 regresó a Italia para reclutar nuevos cantantes, pero la muerte del rey Federico puso fin a su estancia en tierras danesas. En 1769 se trasladó a Londres, donde dio clases de música para poder sobrevivir.

En 1779 fue nombrado maestro de capilla de la catedral de Milán, cargo que mantuvo hasta 1784. Aquí ejerció su verdadera vocación compositora, escribió al menos veinte de sus obras y música sacra para los oficios de la catedral. También en esta etapa ejerció de profesor de música, teniendo como alumno a Luigi Cherubini. En 1784, Sarti fue invitado a San Petersburgo por la emperatriz Catalina II de Rusia. De camino estuvo en Viena, donde el emperador José II de Habsburgo le recibió con gran honor, y conoció a Mozart. Llegó a San Petersburgo en 1785, donde acto seguido le nombraron director de ópera, compuso nuevas piezas y obras de música sacra, incluyendo un Te Deum por la victoria de Ochakiv en la Guerra ruso-turca (1787-1792), donde introdujo un disparo real de un cañón. Permaneció en Rusia hasta 1801, cuando por problemas de salud pidió permiso para salir del país. El tzar Alejandro I de Rusia le concedió en 1802 una generosa pensión; anteriormente Catalina II le había concedido el título nobiliario. Sus óperas de mayor éxito en Rusia fueron Armida e Rinaldo y Gli inizi del governo di Oleg. Murió en Berlín de camino de regreso a Italia.

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Giulio Sabino, dramma per musica en tres actos (1781). Aria del acto segundo: Quando il pensier figura.

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Armida e Rinaldo, dramma per musica en dos actos (1786). Aria del acto primero: Frema, avvampi d'ira.

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Enea nel Lazio, dramma per musica en dos actos (1799). Aria del acto primero: Al fragor di trombe altere.

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Stephen Paul Hartke (*1952) Hartke was born in Orange, New Jersey. He studied at Yale University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of California, Santa Barbara. From 1984 to 1985, he was Fulbright Professor at the Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. He joined the faculty of the Thornton School of Music at the University of Southern California in 1987. He was composer in residence at the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra from 1988 to 1992. In 2015, he took Emeritus status at USC when he moved to Oberlin Conservatory to chair its composition department. Hartke has received commissions from numerous groups, including the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra for the new Brandenburg Project, Glimmerglass Opera (for The Greater Good, or the Passion of Boule de Suif), the New York Philharmonic, the National Symphony Orchestra, and the Hilliard Ensemble. He received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1997, a Charles Ives Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 2004, and the Charles Ives Opera Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 2008. His composition Meanwhile – Incidental Music to Imaginary Puppet Plays won a Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Classical Composition in 2013. Hartke's musical influences include Stravinsky, medieval music, Tudor church music, bebop, gagaku, gamelan, other non-Western musics, and his teachers Leonardo Balada and George Rochberg.

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The Greater Good, or, The Passion of Boule de Suif, ópera en dos actos (2003-2006). Final.

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