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 Asunto: Re: Grandes momentos del viejo Met.
NotaPublicado: 05 Abr 2021 12:50 
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Anthony creo que tiene el record de actuaciones en el MET. Sobre las 3000. Yo llegué a verle como Spoletta en las funciones de Tosca que supusieron la despedida de Pavarotti.

En las versiones propuestas, Pippo juega en otra liga. Su material y carisma son privilegiados frente a tres honrados mortales.

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"No se puede dar el paso más largo que la pierna" (Alfredo Kraus)


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 Asunto: Re: Grandes momentos del viejo Met.
NotaPublicado: 05 Abr 2021 13:59 
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Abdallo escribió:
No es un aria, en efecto; creo que es un "stornello con fiore" una especie de poesía improvisada, puesta aquí en música; y concretamente, ya que estamos es Florencia, sería un "stornello toscano".


La tradición tenoril la ha convertido en aria.

Lo mismo podría decirse de O mio babbino caro para las sopranos.


Última edición por Rubini el 05 Abr 2021 14:18, editado 1 vez en total

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 Asunto: Re: Grandes momentos del viejo Met.
NotaPublicado: 05 Abr 2021 14:14 
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Oh mio babbino caro, estimado Rubini. Papaito en español.

Si nos ponemos con si es aria, monólogo, arioso, racconto, canzone, canzonetta, stornello, barcarola ... El término aria tradicionalmente lo engloba todo y nos entendemos bien. :P Excepto en repertorio Wagneriano, ya que los más militantes nos reñirían argumentando que su Maestro idolatrado abominaba del aria. :D

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"No se puede dar el paso más largo que la pierna" (Alfredo Kraus)


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 Asunto: Re: Grandes momentos del viejo Met.
NotaPublicado: 05 Abr 2021 14:19 
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Rectificado.

Son los efectos de escribir a las 6:00 a.m. :rolling: :rolling: :rolling:


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 Asunto: Re: Grandes momentos del viejo Met.
NotaPublicado: 06 Abr 2021 22:50 
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Registrado: 17 May 2020 15:58
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Me he aficionado últimamente a estas grabaciones del “viejo Met”. Por ahora tengo el Tristán del 43 y la Walkyria del 17 de marzo de 1940 en Boston. Son documentos impresionantes.
Le he echado el ojo a una grabación que no sé si alguno de ustedes conocerá: Trovatore de 1945 con Milanov, Baum y Warren dirigida por Cesare Sodero. ¿Alguien la conoce? Martín Triana se deshace en elogios hacia la Leonora de Milanov en su libro de discografía, pero habla de la versión de estudio.

Un saludo


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 Asunto: Re: Grandes momentos del viejo Met.
NotaPublicado: 07 Abr 2021 0:09 
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José_Manuel escribió:
Me he aficionado últimamente a estas grabaciones del “viejo Met”. Por ahora tengo el Tristán del 43 y la Walkyria del 17 de marzo de 1940 en Boston. Son documentos impresionantes.
Le he echado el ojo a una grabación que no sé si alguno de ustedes conocerá: Trovatore de 1945 con Milanov, Baum y Warren dirigida por Cesare Sodero. ¿Alguien la conoce? Martín Triana se deshace en elogios hacia la Leonora de Milanov en su libro de discografía, pero habla de la versión de estudio.

Un saludo


La grabación de Il Trovatore que cita está disponible en YouTube. Creo que el audio, de calidad desigual, está extraído de la vieja edición noventera del sello Walhall.

Imagen

Con sonido menos comprimido, hay alternativa en la web premiereopera.net.

Imagen

GREAT SOUNDING ORIGINAL MET REEL BROADCAST SERIES.

Special release on 2CDs with announcements and curtain calls.

Manrico – Kurt Baum
Leonora – Zinka Milanov
Count Di Luna – Leonard Warren
Azucena – Bruna Castagna
Ferrando – Nicola Moscona
Ines – Maxine Stellman
Ruiz – Lodovico Oliviero
Gypsy – John Baker

Conductor: Cesare Sodero
2CDs

Acerca de este broadcast de 1945, Paul Jackson ("Saturday Afternoons at the Old Met", pp. 357-359) reseña lo siguiente:

"The Czech tenor Kurt Baum was another escapee from the European conflict. A half-dozen years of opera appearances in Prague, Vienna, Salzburg, and Monte Carlo had preceded his 1939 debut with the Chicago Opera. After settling in the western hemisphere, his José, Radames, and Manrico were heard in Buenos Aires, Mexico City, and Canada. One might expect a healthy voice froma gentleman who had won tha amateur heavyweight boxing championship of Czechoslovakia -to have one's nose broken in an exhibition bout with Max Schmeling is no mean is no mean recomendation for a tenore di forza.
Alas, the voice proves to be as muscled-bound as the body. What price must one pay for two stentorian high Cs in 'Di quella pira' (the third one turns out to be a B-natural, though Baum, unlike most modern tenors, is singing in the original key)? In any case, the price is too dear: a tight, strangled, unmodulated tone which takes on a bleat in cantabile passages, and pitch suspiciously flat a good deal of the time. The tenor is not devoid of a feeling for the architecture of Verdi's Music -his denunciation of Leonora has not only size but breadth of manner. In fact, his entirely fourth act arouses a dlicker of hope: the voice takes on a bit of color, pitch is relatively faithful, and he conducts the line with care in the reflective duets with Azucena. Whether hope is enough to explain a Metropolitan career of twenty-two seasons is another matter.
A briefer career, but one of far greater import, comes to a close on this broadcast, the final day of the 1944-45 season. Bruna Castagna, since 1935 the stalwart mezzo of the Italian wing, will be heard no more at the Metropolitan; on the season's tour she sings only a single Maddalena in Rigoletto (Harshaw gains the maety assignments). At age forty-seven, Castagna's instrument is no longer quite as resplendent in volume and tonal sheen, but that she was still very much the best of her kind (at least in America -Ebe Stignani was active in Italy) is obvious from this final hearing. Even more impressive than her vocal command is her fully developed characterization. Her Azucena is no mere crazed demon.
Fond memories of Azucena's mountain home, tender regard for her foster son, are the heart of Castagna's portrayal. How well she knows her way around the twists and turns of Azucena's music: the dotted sixteenths of 'Stride la Vampa' are neatly articulated, Verdi's dynamic shadings are carefully observed, and while she hardly ever olays to the gallery, she is alive to the built-in theatrics of the role. Not only is she willing but still able to provide that extra fill-up to a phrase at a climatic moment (a broad allargando and deep portamento, rather old-fashioned but delectable, at the end of the aria). The second-act racconto is touched with sorrow in the tone, compassion and horror skillfully intermingled. Everything is adroitly scaled until she pleads with Manrico before he flees to save Leonora from the convent -there she pulls aout all the strops. Perhaps the size of the voice in the theatre cannot be accurately gauged, but the vocal thrust is obviously potent; an occasional rasp as she eases into the chest voice is the only sign of wear. Her final act is the acme of her performance; there liquid legato, quiet regret, artfully sculpted phrases ('Si la stanchezza'), all combine to produce a childlike aura, as telling as it is simple.
If artists must leave, Castagna does so honorably. She remains, today as then, an underrated artist, never having gained the acclaim which her natural instrument and cultivated style warrant. Her commercial recordings, though splendid, are few in number. In her case the legacy of the aircheck is all-important.
With the exception of Baum, all elements of this performance are on a high level. Moscona is the best of Ferrandos, a mite less scrupulous this time in rhythm, but more overtly dramatic and thereby serving the narrative well. Sodero has shapened the dramatic focus of his concept, retaining classical control but willing to touch the crop to his forces in the home strecht of the ensembles.
As Di Luna, Warren disdains to play the heavy, preferring bel canto as love's weapon. He relishes the high tessitura of the role and breasts any orchestral sonoritywith ease. But 'Il balen' turns out a bit more tremulous that expected, and the notion ligers that all that suave tone and musical rectitude is just a bit self-conscious. One longs for the natural song of a Battistini or Schlusnus or, conversely, Ruffo's direct assault. But then, Warren can caress the ear as weel as play the lion. His voice takes on a lovely color in the duet with Leonora, a discreet foil for Milanov's far-flung phrases. Sodero's newly propulsive manner combines with the vocal richness and idiomatic style of the two singers to provide the afternoon's climax.
Milanov, too, is at her very best. One is tempted to speak of vintage Milanov, but in her case the full flavor of the draft still lies in the future. Nevertheless, her Leonora on this afternoon is the apex of her first Metropolitan career. All her virtues and none of her frailties are on display.
Leonora's great arias can only be fully realized by the poise of voice and repose of phrase which Milanov offers on this occasion. Arioso passages are floated with the utmost delicacy ('come d'aurato sogno'); the low voice is well focused without becoming unduly baritonal for this chaste Verdi heroine; the brief trills are neatly done, and the coloratura flourishes are not only clean but full-throated (with an acceptable high D-flat at the end of the trio and a magnificent high C to close the fourth-act duet); and the three-note phrases which decorate the convent finale are leggierissimo, as Verdi instructed. Unlike many a Leonora, she has the vocal size and fruity middle low voice to sound the anguished lament of the Miserere. Her old bane of agitation almost never causes a suspicion of tonal overblowing.
When interviewed on a broadcast intermission twenty years after her retirement, Madame Milanov remarked truthfully: «Trovatore was my destiny». Vocally, it offered her every opportunity to show her strenghts. And more than any other of her roles, it was dramatically plausiblefor her, not merely from the standpoint of stage action, but also in the projection of character and mood through the voice. Leonora exists in the splendid insolation of the Spainsh donna of the fifteenth century -her vocal reveries epitomize her remoteness. The built-in distance makes entirely credible Milanov's expansive phrasing and stylized expressive devices, so musically satisfying in themselves, as revelation of character. Of course, her Gioconda has dramatic credibility too, but there it is because her outsized vocal gestures complement the mock theatrics of melodrama. Verdi is not Ponchielli. His truth must be taken at face value. As the Trovatore Leonora, Milanov can be not only relished but believed.
After years of struggle, the great soprano may have come into her own. Odd that, after only two more seasons, the Met would no longer welcome her."

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Anche l' idea muor, tu non muori giammai,
tu, l' Eterna canzon!


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 Asunto: Re: Grandes momentos del viejo Met.
NotaPublicado: 07 Abr 2021 0:42 
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Carl Tunner escribió:
Anthony creo que tiene el record de actuaciones en el MET. Sobre las 3000.


Nada menos que 2928. Levine, el segundo, no llega a las 2600.

http://archives.metoperafamily.org/archives/singers.xml


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 Asunto: Re: Grandes momentos del viejo Met.
NotaPublicado: 07 Abr 2021 9:17 
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Registrado: 17 May 2020 15:58
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Impresionante, El Chino Cudeiro, mil gracias por tomarse las molestias de compartir con nosotros ese texto. No conocía premiereopera.net, ahora tendré que ponerme a explorar :D
¿Ese libro de Jackson donde se puede encontrar? Parece una joya.

Un saludo


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 Asunto: Re: Grandes momentos del viejo Met.
NotaPublicado: 07 Abr 2021 16:45 
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José_Manuel escribió:
¿Ese libro de Jackson donde se puede encontrar? Parece una joya.

Un saludo


Lo compré de segunda mano en eBay hace unos años, imagino que aún se podrá encontrar en tiendas de internet a buen precio. Forma parte de una trilogía -la completan los libros "Sign-off for the Old Met" y Start-up at the New Met"- que recoge reseñas y anécdotas acerca de las transmisiones radiofónicas desde el Metropolitan en el período 1931-1976. Son libros que no me canso de recomendar, pues aparte de la información que aportan, incluyen bastantes fotografías de cantantes, directores, etc. El único "pero" es que el autor no comenta algunos broadcasts del período que hoy sabemos que se conservan.

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Anche l' idea muor, tu non muori giammai,
tu, l' Eterna canzon!


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 Asunto: Re: Grandes momentos del viejo Met.
NotaPublicado: 08 Abr 2021 20:59 
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Registrado: 17 May 2020 15:58
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A buscarlo toca! La verdad es que este tipo de libros me encantan, la biografía de Hotter por ejemplo me encantó. Si conocen libros de este tipo, de historias y anécdotas de opera y grabaciones que se conserven, me encantaría que me recomendasen.


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