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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 22 Oct 2021 19:39 
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Veselin Anastasov Stoyanov (1902-1969) He was born in Shumen, Bulgaria. From 1926 to 1930 he studied composition with Franz Schmidt at the Vienna Hochschule für Musik. After returning to Bulgaria he first worked as a concert pianist then as a conductor and professor of composition and theory at the Sofia Conservatory. He was director of the conservatory during the years 1943–1945 and 1956–1962, and director of the Sofia National Opera from 1953 to 1954. In its tending towards exoticism, large-scale forces and through-composed forms sustained by leitmotif technique, his work bears the hallmarks of late Romanticism as represented by Strauss. A national stamp to this style is provided by modal colouring, peculiarly Bulgarian irregular rhythms, complicated rhythmic figures and melismas, as well as the use of Balkan modes containing the interval of the augmented 2nd. These are all present in his most important work, the opera Salammbo based on Flaubert's novel. The dramatic charge of elevated emotions and fateful passions, presented against the broad canvas of the bizarre and exotic world of ancient Carthage, made the splendour and superabundance of the late Romantic orchestra the composer's natural choice. As in Strauss's Salome, the dramaturgy of Salammbo is driven by a sequence of confrontational dialogues, each increasing the tension but embedded within a Romantic choral tableau. Stoyanov's preference for instrumental genres such as the symphonic poem and the suite, and the underlying programmaticism of most of his works, also prove his allegiance to the Romantic tradition. The Bulgarian cultural tradition, on the other hand, is the source for the grotesque, caricature-like musical characterization of works such as Zhensko tsarstvo [The Kingdom of Women] and Bay Ganyu. Stoyanov simplified his musical language after the revolution of 1944 in order to accommodate the call for new, socialist art. Diatonic tonal organization, a song-like melodic style and symmetrical rhythmic phrases became the principal features of his new language, while dramatic conflict and powerful emotions gave way to lighthearted, life-affirming subject matter, as in the opera Khitar Petar [Cunning Peter] and the Prasnichna uvertyura (‘Festival Overture’).

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Khitar Petar, ópera cómica (1958). Aria: Zvezdíte tázi noshch blestyát.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 29 Oct 2021 19:29 
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Marie François Maurice Emmanuel (1862-1938) He was born in Bar-sur-Aube, a small town in the Champagne-Ardenne region of northeastern France. It was there where he first heard his grandfather's printing press which according to his granddaughter, Anne Eichner-Emmanuel, first gave him the feeling of rhythm. Brought up in Dijon, Marie François Maurice Emmanuel became a chorister at Beaune cathedral after his family moved to the city in 1869. According to his granddaughter, Anne Eichner-Emmanuel, he was influenced by the brass bands on the streets of Beaune and by the "songs of the grape pickers which imprinted melodies in his memory so different from all the classical music he was taught in the academy of music." Subsequently, he went to Paris, and he entered the Paris Conservatoire, where his composition teacher was Léo Delibes. However, Delibes' strong disapproval of his early modal compositions (Cello Sonata, Op. 2, Sonatinas No. 1, Op. 4 and No. 2, Op. 5) caused a rift between them and subsequently caused him to study with Ernest Guiraud also at the Conservatoire. At the Conservatoire he came to know Claude Debussy who was also a pupil there. In addition, he attended the Conservatoire classes of César Franck, about whom he wrote a short book in 1930 (César Franck: Etude Critique). Emmanuel pursued a notable academic career. He wrote a treatise in 1895 on the music of Ancient Greece, and was appointed professor of the history of music at the Conservatoire in 1909. His students included Olivier Messiaen and Henri Dutilleux. Emmanuel's interests included folksong, Oriental music, and exotic modes — his use of these modes in various of his works had appalled Delibes, who had vetoed his entering for the Prix de Rome. Other appointments included choirmaster at the church of Sainte-Clotilde from 1904 to 1907, assisted by Émile Poillot, during the tenure of organist Charles Tournemire. The compositions of Emmanuel, seldom heard today even in France, include operas after Aeschylus (Prométhée enchaîné and Salamine) as well as symphonies and string quartets. Probably the creations of his most often performed now are his six sonatines for solo piano, which (like many of his other pieces) demonstrate his eclectic academic interests. The first of the sonatines draws on the music of Burgundy, while the second incorporates birdsong, the third uses a Burgundian folk tune in its finale, and the fourth is subtitled en divers modes hindous ("in various Hindu modes").

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Salamine, tragedia lírica en tres actos (1921-1923, 1927-1928). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 05 Nov 2021 21:32 
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Nicola Segatta (*1982) Nacido en Trento, Segatta es compositor, violonchelista y laudero. Como violonchelista se formó con Enrico Bronzi, Rocco Filippini, Marco Decimo y Giovanni Sollima. Compositor autodidacta, desde 2011 interpreta su propia música con La Piccola Orchestra Lumière. También ha escrito bandas sonoras para películas mudas, obras de radio, música para teatro y danza. Desde 2010 trabaja como compositor de música incidental para los talleres de teatro del director Marco Alotto en Italia y Francia. Con Giovanni Sollima y La Piccola Orchestra Lumière publicó el álbum Shakespeare for Dreamers, y para Quadrivium de EGEA la ópera Ikone y el Concierto bizantino para violonchelo y orquesta. Fue asistente del artista estadounidense Tim Linhart en la construcción de instrumentos de hielo. Graduado de laudero en Cremona, se dedica a la fabricación de violonchelos. Toca un instrumento de su propia creación.

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Ikone, ópera (2020). Kyrie eleīson.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 12 Nov 2021 19:50 
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Yuri Markovitch Butsko (1938-2015) He was born in Lubny, Ukraine. Boutsko is known as an author of vocal, instrumental and chamber music as well as of music for theater and cinema. He wrote 4 Operas, 2 Oratorios, 7 Cantatas, 13 Symphonies and 18 Concertos for different instruments. The musical language of Youri Boutsko was deeply inspired by Russian musical tradition, in particular — by works of Modest Mussorgsky and Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. On the other hand, his music is based on the traditional Christian Orthodox liturgy: the composer often uses either themes that remind of the Znamenny chant, or its real citations. He was professor of the Moscow State Tchaikovsky Conservatory from 1968 to 2015.

Diary of a Madman, mono-ópera (1964). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 19 Nov 2021 16:37 
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Charles Henry Jean Colin (1863-1950) Nació en Ciboure (Lapurdi). Hijo del pintor Gustave Colin, recibió de su padre las primeras lecciones que, posteriormente, amplió en París en la Academia Humbert et Gervex entre 1885 y 1890. Pintó escenas del País Vasco, en particular de Ciboure y Saint-Jean-de-Luz, el mar y las corridas de toros. Fue elegido teniente de alcalde de Ciboure en 1892 y en 1902 Juez de Paz en Espelette. Al crearse el Musée Basque en el año 1922 se le nombró Vicepresidente de la Comisión Art et Décoration. Como músico y poeta compuso diversas melodías, cantos, cantos religiosos y villancicos y algunas pastorales con letra de Étienne Decrept (Amatchi, Leyorrian, Semetchia, Eginbidia, Etchezahar, Alaba, Etcheko Angerua, Maitena).

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Maitena, pastoral lírica vasca (1905-1908). Fragmento.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 26 Nov 2021 20:29 
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Carlo Francesco Pollarolo (ca. 1653-1723) He was born in Brescia. Pollarolo was probably a pupil of his father, Orazio Pollarolo, organist in Brescia at the parish church of SS Nazaro e Celso (c1665–1669) and at the cathedral (1669–c1675). Before 1676, in which year his son Antonio Pollarolo was born, Carlo Francesco was organist at the Congregazione dei Padri della Pace, and he substituted for his father at the cathedral for more than a year before being named his successor on 18 December 1676 (it is not known why Orazio had left the city or where he went). On becoming organist at the cathedral Carlo Francesco relinquished his other post. The records of SS Nazaro e Celso establish his marriage in 1674 and the baptisms of his first two children. The family moved at least twice to different parishes of the city, for the baptisms of the next two children, in 1678 and 1679, are recorded at S Afra, whereas those of four more children between 1682 and 1689 are recorded at S Zeno. During these years Pollarolo advanced rapidly in his profession. On 12 February 1680 the maestro di cappella, Pietro Pelli, resigned his position at Brescia Cathedral, and Pollarolo was elected capo musico in his place. On 7 June 1681 he assumed a comparable position in the Accademia degli Erranti, a society devoted to ‘letters, arms, and music’; he probably continued in this capacity until 1689. His first opera, Venere travestita, had been performed at the Accademia in 1678. A libretto records the performance in 1680 of his earliest oratorio, La fenice, the music of which is lost. From 1685 on his activity as opera and oratorio composer intensified: I delirii per amore was given at Brescia, La Rosinda in Vienna (both in 1685), Il demone amante, overo Giugurta opened the 1686 season in Venice, followed the same year by Il Licurgo, overo Il cieco d’acuta vista. His Roderico (1687), La costanza gelosa negl’amori di Cefalo e Procri (1688) and Alarico re de Gotti (1689) were given at Verona, and a version of Antonino e Pompeiano with most of the music by Pollarolo at the Teatro in Brescia in 1689. Thus he was an established composer before his arrival in Venice. He and his family must have left Brescia by the end of 1689, when a new organist (G.B. Quaglia) was elected at the cathedral, but his younger brother Paolo (b 1672) and the latter’s son Orazio (d 1765), who composed a few operas, pursued musical careers in Brescia. His daughter Giulia married the organ builder Giacinto Pescetti, a fellow Brescian, in 1697 and the opera composer Giovanni Battista Pescetti was their son.

On 13 August 1690 Carlo Francesco was elected second organist at S Marco, Venice. Two years later he attained the position of vicemaestro di cappella, an unusually quick advancement. From 1691 his operas were performed in the Venetian theatres at the rate of one or more each year. He dominated the most reputable opera house in the city, S Giovanni Grisostomo, from about 1691 to about 1707 and also had works staged at S Angelo, S Cassiano, S Fantino and other theatres in and outside Venice. The Pollarolo family settled in the parish of S Simeon Grande in Venice, where a further son was born in 1692. Ten years later Carlo Francesco competed for the position of primo maestro at the cathedral but lost the election by one vote to Antonio Biffi. His letter of application refers to his seven children. Three months later Pollarolo was ‘giubilato’, i.e. relieved of his regular duties without loss of status, and his son Antonio took over his duties as vicemaestro. But Pollarolo’s activity as an opera composer had reached a peak and continued strongly until about 1720. His best works date from the period from 1690 to 1705. His tenure as musical director of the Ospedale degli Incurabili, one of the four famous Venetian conservatories, can be ascertained from librettos and from Coronelli’s Guida de’ forestieri: it dated at least from 1696 to 1718, perhaps even to 1722. The librettos of the Latin oratorios Tertius crucis triumphus (1703), Samson vindicatus (1706), Joseph in Aegypto (1707), Rex regum (1716) and Davidis de Goliath triumphus (1718) establish his authorship of the music as well as his position at the Incurabili. He wrote music for other institutions and occasions too: in 1697 an oratorio, Il combattimento degli angioli, for S Maria della Consolazione (La Fava), and in 1699 an intermezzo, Il giudizio di Paride, for the Accademia degli Animosi, whose guiding spirit was Apostolo Zeno. Then in 1716 Pollarolo composed a cantata, Fede, Valore, Gloria e Fama (in which Faustina Bordoni sang the part of Faith), for the Austrian ambassador to Venice, and the wedding of the ambassador’s son in 1721 was celebrated with Pollarolo’s music to Il pescatore disingannato. His last stage work was the opera L’Arminio, produced in November 1722, when he was already suffering from his final illness, which lasted six months. He was buried in S Maria di Nazareth, known as the church of the Scalzi, located on the bank of the Grand Canal in Venice. Pollarolo was also famous as a performer: in 1710 Don G. Desiderio counted him, with Francesco Gasparini and Vinaccesi, as one of the ‘tre de’ primi virtuosi de questa dominante’ (Talbot, 74) and Galliard mentioned him among ‘the foremost masters for the harpsichord’ (Raguenet).

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Giulio Cesare nell’Egitto, dramma per musica en tres actos (1713). Aria: Sdegnoso turbine.

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Ariodante, dramma per musica en tres actos (1716). Aria: Già mi par.

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 Asunto: Re: La otra ópera
NotaPublicado: 03 Dic 2021 20:33 
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Franz Ignaz Beck (1734-1809) He was born in Mannheim. He received violin lessons from his father Johann Aloys Beck, an oboist and choir school Rektor at the Palatine court whose name is listed in the calendars of 1723 and 1734. He also learnt the double bass, among other instruments, and eventually came under the tutelage of Johann Stamitz, who arrived in Mannheim in 1741. The Palatine court, under Carl Theodor, recognized Beck’s talent and undertook responsibility for his education. Several sources maintain that Beck left the Palatinate at an early age to study composition with Galuppi in Venice. According to his pupil Blanchard (1845), however, Beck was the object of a jealous intrigue that involved him in a duel during which his opponent was supposedly killed (many years later Beck met his former opponent, who had only feigned death); Beck then presumably fled and travelled in Italy, giving concerts in principal cities. In any event, he spent several years in Venice before eloping to Naples with Anna Oniga, the daughter of his employer.

After Beck’s stay in Italy (probably in the 1750s), he moved to Marseilles and became the leader of a theatre orchestra. It is not certain whether he arrived in France before about 1760, but in the late 1750s Parisian firms published more than 20 of Beck’s symphonies in fairly rapid succession. In 1757 a symphony by ‘Signor Beck’ was listed in two Concert Spirituel programmes. The title-pages of his op.1 (1758) and op.3 (1762) describe him as ‘chamber virtuoso to the Elector Palatine’ but add ‘and presently first violin of the Concert in Marseilles’. At least seven performances of his symphonies were given at Marseilles in 1760–1761.

Beck soon moved from Marseilles to Bordeaux, where he continued his interest in the theatre, subsequently becoming the conductor of the elegant Grand Théâtre. By 1764, when his first child was born, he was active as a teacher; his students included Pierre Gaveaux, Henri-Louis Blanchard and Bochsa. Beck was appointed organist at St Seurin, Bordeaux, on 24 October 1774 and his exceptional improvisatory skill drew considerable admiration from the congregation. Several sets of his keyboard pieces were printed in Paris and Dresden as well as Bordeaux. In 1783 he travelled to Paris for the first performance of his Stabat mater at Versailles and in 1789 the overture and incidental music to Pandore were performed in Paris at the Théâtre de Monsieur. He also directed concerts of the Société du Musée in Bordeaux. During the Revolution he composed patriotic music, including a Hymne à l’être suprême. In 1803 the new government honoured Beck by naming him correspondent of music composition for the Institut de France.

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L’isle déserte, ópera cómica (1779). L'amour éprouve mon âme.

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